Eat with Confidence – Try this Low-FODMAP E-Course!

So you’ve just come back from the doctor, and he/she suggested you go on the low-FODMAP diet.  Yeah, low-FODMAP what?!?  I know how you feel and what you’re thinking right now because I too was there before.  Uncomfortable, low energy, a distended belly, constipation (maybe it’s diarrhea and/or constipation for you), abdominal pain, and most of the time I had no desire to do much of anything.  IBS was like the evil monster lurking in the closet, always there and sometimes too scary to handle.

However, now there’s no ugly monster.

Yes maybe sometimes my IBS comes back, but it’s not scary and I can handle it.  It’s all because I found the low-FODMAP diet and really paid attention to FODMAPs, to my body and to giving myself what I needed – stress relief included.   I did it all on my own without a support system, and with additional training in nutrition.  However, you don’t have do this whole FODMAP thing alone and you don’t need to formally study nutrition, but you can learn more about the diet, more about food, and cooking really good dishes for yourself.  The road you can consider taking is a new course (no pun intended), called The Everything Low-FODMAP™ E-Course.

Before I go on, I want to be totally transparent.  This course is developed by two ladies I call my friends.  We have low-FODMAP books under the same publisher and series and have been working together to help people like yourself to have a happier gut and we just really want to get the word out about the low-FODMAP diet.

bolen bradleyThe two ladies I am speaking of are sisters Dr. Barbara Bolen and Kathleen Bradley, CPC.  Dr. Bolen has been working with IBS clients for some time now and is also the IBS expert on About.com.  Kathleen has dealt with IBS herself and they both really care about making you empowered.  

More About the Course

The Everything Low-FODMAP™ E-Course includes a series of self-paced classes, where you will learn all about how to successfully use the diet by listening to informative, easy-to-follow podcasts. You will be able to download helpful handouts, cheat sheets, low-FODMAP recipes to help you to achieve success on the diet.  Also, as a student in the Everything Low-FODMAP™ E-Course, you will be invited to participate in a private Facebook group – a comfortable place for you to get questions answered and to share and benefit from diet tips and recipes. Like I mentioned before, you will not be following this diet all alone!

The course only costs $57REGISTER HERE

Low-FODMAP-Ecourse-2-Week-Header-1

Just follow this link to learn more about the course, if it is for you, and if so, sign up!

Also, the first 10 people to sign up for the course will receive a free copy of each of our books.  That’s 450 recipes, plus information on the science behind the diet, the phases of the diet, tips and advice, how to read labels, menu plans and low- and high-FODMAP lists plus much more.  Consider these books and the E-course your tickets to a possible life without gut-wrenching symptoms and a brighter future where you look forward to getting dressed up and eating with confidence (and I really mean that!).

Colleen Post 3 (1)

Here are links to the books on Amazon for your reference:

Good luck!

Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Looking for help on the low-FODMAP diet?  Ask me about my nutritional counseling services by contacting me here.

Be good to yourself and your gut!BEC_6825

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme
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Your Facebook Questions Answered, Q and A Sunday – Low-FODMAP Diet

This post is dedicated to our Facebook fans!  A couple weeks ago I asked on Facebook:

“Tell me one thing you’d like to learn more about (the low-FODMAP diet) and I’ll choose ten comments to respond to via a blog post.”  There was a huge response, and many of the ten questions I chose did not come with simple explanations (as you all know perfectly well, this is certainly not a simple diet!).  Also, everyday I receive dozens of questions about the diet via Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and email.  So I felt it was a great opportunity to do something different and bring you the Low-FODMAP Diet Q & A Sunday.

low fodmap q and aWhen ever you see the image above on my social media channels, just ask your question below the image and check my blog every Sunday to see if I’ve answered your question.  Take this opportunity to read other fans’ questions as you will learn much about the low-FODMAP diet!

So without further ado, here are two REALLY GOOD questions to which I’ve got great answers:

Question 1: Rachel Wittman Cox- Question: “What is a good filling easy fodmap breakfast and how long do most people stay on it before noticing improvements?”

Answer:  I tend to go with eggs whites in the morning for some nice filling protein.  I’ll then add a low-FODMAP cheese like mozzarella, a low-FODMAP veggie like spinach and a piece of gluten-free toast with coconut oil or butter.  Other ideas are:

  • Gluten-free oats with 1 tbsp slivered almonds and 10-20 blueberries
  • Quinoa flakes with almond milk, 3/4 cup strawberries and 10 macadamia nut halves or other low-FODMAP nut.
  • Lactose-free yogurt with 10 raspberries, 10 walnut halves and a sprinkle of unsweetened coconut flakes.
  • Gluten-free toast with 1 tablespoon sunflower, peanut or almond butter and two small, peeled kiwis.

To answer the other question, some people feel results in a couple days, some a couple of weeks.  Everyone is different, and it also depends how diligent you are about following the diet.  Thankfully up to 70% of people following the diet can find an improvement in symptoms (per research by Peter Gibson, a professor of gastroenterology at Australia’s Monash University, and co-founder of the low-FODMAP diet).

Gut health word cloud on a white background.

Question 2: Karen Hazlett – Question: “I know I can’t digest high fodmap foods but I have no idea why, medically speaking. Is there a known reason?”

Answer: Some people have trouble digesting FODMAPs due to the fact that FODMAPs ferment, causing gas/wind, bloating, diarrhea, distention and/or constipation. FODMAPs are short-chain carbohydrates which are poorly absorbed in the small intestine (your small intestine is supposed to absorb nutrients and minerals from food) and then are rapidly fermented by bacteria in the gut. The bacteria produces gas which plays a large role in the onslaught of symptoms.  The bacteria are basically eating FODMAP carbohydrates and then fermenting the sugar molecules.

Since fermentation causes gas it can make diarrhea worse or contribute to constipation. The methane gas that is produced can cause constipation while the hydrogen can increase GI motility.  What is GI motility?  It is defined by the movements of the digestive system, and the transit of the contents within it. When nerves or muscles in any portion of the digestive tract do not function with their normal strength and coordination, a person develops symptoms related to motility problems.

These FODMAPs or small undigested remnants of oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols accumulate gases and cause what is called an osmotic effect.

FODMAPs are “osmotic” which means they cause water to be drawn into the intestines, leading to diarrhea.  Stool stays more watery than usual which leads to bloating, gas, diarrhea, and pain.

The food we eat is broken down by one or more enzymes which are chemicals that digest foods into energy for your cells.  In order for carbohydrate digestion to take place we need amylase.  Amylase is produced in the pancreas and the glands that make saliva.  As you chew, the amylase continues to break down carbohydrates throughout your digestive system. Amylase breaks down carbs into their individual sugars as they pass from the mouth to the stomach and the gut. The cells lining your gut can absorb them and distribute them to other parts of your body for energy.

Since FODMAPs aren’t completely digested in the small intestine like other carbs, they manage to pass through to the large intestine intact, instead of being absorbed in the gut and used for energy. Why does this happen?  It’s because we can’t break down FODMAPs (a) or we can’t absorb them in the small intestine (b):

(a) Amylase is the main enzyme responsible for starch digestion, and if the quantity of starch consumed is so high that not enough amylase is available to keep up with it, your gut may not digest everything. Some FODMAPs reach the large intestine intact because a person does not have the enzymes necessary to digest them. People who have lactose (the disaccharide “D”) intolerance have a deficiency of the enzyme lactase (needed to break down lactose down into simple sugars). Everyone reacts to raffinose (one of the oligosaccharides, the “O” in FODMAPs), because humans lack the enzyme to completely break it down.  Raffinose is a sugar present in sugar beet, cotton seed, and many grains. It is a trisaccharide containing glucose, galactose, and fructose units.

(b) Fructose (the monosaccharide “M” in FODMAPs) is a simple sugar and doesn’t need to be broken down further.  It is difficult to absorb, so it stays in the intestine instead of getting transported through the intestinal wall into the body.  So for instance, with fructose malabsorption there is an increased concentration of fructose in the entire intestine.  In order for fructose to be absorbed in healthy people, only about 25–50 g can be consumed per sitting. People with fructose malabsorption absorb less than 25 g per sitting.

Humans can produce small amounts of the enzymes needed to break up galacto-oligosaccharides and fructans into their individual subunits.  One person to the next may handle galacto-oligosaccharides and fructans differently.  As an example, you might be able to enjoy hummus and break down the galacto-oligosaccharides in it, but you may not be able to break down the fructans in the bread you used to dip in the hummus.  It might be the opposite for someone sitting next to you with IBS.  Our immune systems (for people with and people without IBS) handle food, outside pathogens and stress differently.  And to be very scientific:

Humans have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose since its absorption is an energy independent process and this capacity is quite variable [9, 10].

“Malabsorption of fructose generates an osmotic force which increases water influx into the lumen and then leads to rapid propulsion of bowel contents into the colon, which is then fermented and leads to production of gas.

Stomach / Guts / Small Intestine - Male anatomy of human organs - x-ray view

“The most common structural forms of fructan are inulin, levanare and geraminan. The human body has limited ability to break down these oligo- or polysaccharides in the small bowel and only absorbs 5 – 15% of fructan [22, 23]. The mechanism for malabsorption and intolerance is related to the lack of enzymes to fully hydrolyze glycosidic linkages in the complex polysaccharide, and therefore results in the malabsorbed fructans to be delivered to the colon, which are then fermented [24]. Furthermore, the small molecule of fructans draws more water into the intestine which can result in bloating and diarrhea [24].

“At least 70% of polyols are not absorbed in healthy individuals [29].

In our gastrointestinal tract, we have two primary types of bacteria called bacteroidetes and firmicutes. Bacteriodetes are good because they will eat carbs, protein and fat, but firmicutes eat mostly carbs and fiber. Research has found that people with IBS, (which is often a SIBO related condition) tend to have more firmicutes than bacteriodetes.  The more firmicutes one has in the gut, the more there is to ferment FODMAPS.  “Approximately 100 trillion bacterial cells live in the GI tract, mostly in the large intestine.  While colonic bacteria predominantly are from two bacterial phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, there are about 400 species represented and the gut flora profile (type of bacteria and amounts of each type) is highly variable from one individual to another and even within individuals over time. Family members, however, share more similar gut flora than unrelated individuals.”

Then there is STRESS and did you know that stress can affect bacteria?  When you are going through a rough time like the death of a loved one, the loss of a job or the ending of a relationship, the emotional stress you experience releases adrenal stress hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline. Your brain gets worked over by these stress hormones as your vagus nerve gets stimulated. The brain-gut connection is this same vagus nerve that is involved with stress.  Your blood supply is reduced and therefore it’s harder for your body to properly digest foods and manage the balance of bacteria (a balance is essential for your gut-microbiome). Stress hurts your digestion, and poor digestion makes you feel more stressed.

And finally, please read this response from Jane G. Muir, PhD and Peter R. Gibson, MD in Gastroenterology and Hepatology July, 2013, The Low FODMAP Diet for Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Other Gastrointestinal Disorders: “The topic of food intolerance is a challenging area of research, and more quality research is required. The success of the low FODMAP diet for control of gastrointestinal symptoms associated with IBS and the controversy surrounding gluten sensitivity have stimulated greater interest in dietary research. Besides carbohydrates, there are many other food components worthy of study. For example, dietary fat has been shown in acute studies to change visceral hypersensitivity. Naturally occurring chemicals are widespread in foods and can interact with receptors in the gut or have direct, possibly pharmacologic actions on the enteric nervous system and mast cells. Although dietary approaches that restrict natural salicylates, glutamates, and amines are currently in practice, few well-designed studies investigating the potential role of food chemicals in patients with functional gut disorders have been performed. Clearly, more work is required in this area.”

That’s it for this Sunday.  Don’t forget to follow me on social media an sign up for my newsletter!

Have a great rest of your day, and I look forward to your questions!

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant

Sources:

TRAVELING on the Low FODMAP diet: Tips to keep the belly happy (and a simple recipe)

Hi friends!! I am beyond STOKED to contribute to this blog 🙂 and I want to thank Colleen for welcoming me! I hope to be able to inspire others on this FODMAP journey, maybe making life a little easier!!!

Since MEMORIAL DAY is around the corner, which means Summer weekend getaways (woooohoooo)I thought what a better time than now to talk about traveling tips on the low FODMAP diet.  Lets face it, traveling can be super stressful when you are on a restrictive diet (and cause anxiety which is a BIGGGGG NO NO for us tummy issue folk). Here are few tips that work for me and keep me sane on my travels, since I refuse to let my dietary restrictions control MY LIFE ( I shall control them 😉 :

ITEMS TO PACK:

MY TRAVEL NECESSITIES
MY TRAVEL NECESSITIES
  • PEPPERMINT TEA BAGS: Perfect for taming an upset traveling tummy.
  • RICE CAKES: Lundberg brown rice are my fave.
  • JUSTINS ALMOND BUTTER PACKETS OR A JAR OF PEANUTBUTTER : I prefer PB since almond butter has a limit, 1 tbsp= about 12 almonds which is OVER the low FODMAP limit of 10 almonds. Nut butters are great to spread on your ricecakes with Banana coins for breakfast, snacks or whatev. Bananas are easy to find anywhere. Perfect airplane or train snack!
The perfect tummy friendly snack
The perfect tummy friendly snack
  • CINNAMON: for your bananas/ricecakes
  • OATMEAL: I bring gluten free Bobs Red Mill quick cooking oats in ziplock bags. Add boiling water in a paper cup, add chia seeds, bananas,peanutbutter, cinnamon: fiberfulBFAST!

    photo 3-2
    YUM!
  • CHIA SEEDS: Fiber when traveling!
  • ZIPLOCK BAGS/PLASTIC KNIVES/MEASURING CUPS: I pack these because you can easily carry your snacks around, use the knives to cut bananas, and measuring cups for your oats/chia seeds/nut butters.
  • PRE SOAKED NUTS : raw almonds,hazelnuts, walnuts (all limit 10), pumpkin seeds(2 tbsp), when soaked are easier for digestion.
  • DIY TRAILMIXES:  Throw in gluten free pretzels, nuts, any low fodmap cereal, ‘enjoy life’ choco chips.. etc, get creative here and know your limits..
  • HOMEMADE COOKIES: this is one of my FAV traveling items because they can keep well for a week in a mini fridge and it can work as a breakfast/snack/dessert when everyone else is indulging in ice-cream or whatever those non FODMAP people eat ;), take out a yummy cookie!

RECIPE: EASY Oatmeal Banana cookie

The easiest oatmeal cookie
The easiest oatmeal cookie
  • 1 cup old fashioned oats
  • 2 medium bananas
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda

Optional add-ins: 10 or so chopped almonds,hazelnuts or pecans ,1/4c unsweetened shredded coconut, 2 tbsp raw pumpkin seeds, 1/4 c enjoy life chocolate chips..

Instructions: Mix ingredients together. Flatten about a tablespoon fof the mix on baking sheet sprayed with coconut oil. Bake at 350 c for 10-12 minutes until the bottoms are golden.  Makes about 10-15 cookies.

HAPPY TRAVELING AND WISHING DIGESTIVE PEACE AND LOVE FOR ALL!!

XO

SHOSHANA

P.S.: AWESOME TIP FOR DINING OUT: I always tell my server that I have ALLERGIES rather than intolerances. I always find this makes them take it more serious!

SURF
ANDDDDDD GONE SURFING 😉 ALOHA!

 

All About Fiber and the Low-FODMAP Diet

Healthy Homemade Oatmeal With BerriesAs a Certified Nutritionist I can tell you about the food you can eat while you are on the Elimination Phase of the low-FODMAP diet – and that you may consider consuming foods rich in fiber and low in FODMAPs instead of taking a fiber supplement.  This way you may actually receive a more accurate reading on what’s causing your symptoms, as fiber supplements could be the culprit.

Do We Need Extra Fiber?

Fiber is exclusively a plant nutrient and plants need fiber in order to stand up tall or keep their shape.  And simply put, whenever we eat more plant-based foods, we increase our fiber!  Eating low-FODMAP fruits, vegetables, nuts and beans (green) will help to naturally increase fiber, as well as give us phytonutrients and antioxidants which have been said to prevent disease and keep your body working properly.

We have learned from our mothers that fiber is very important to help keep things “moving” and it’s true – but only for some.  The problem, is that for people with digestive issues, sometimes fiber or too much, even from supplements can cause painful symptoms.  
Getting enough fiber could help prevent obesity, lower your risk of diabetes (helps control blood sugar levels) and heart disease (lower cholesterol levels) and help with constipation.  Be wary of what you hear from the media, doctors or The Whole Grains Council – like this statement “a high intake of cereal fiber (the fiber from grain foods) was associated with a 19% lower risk of death from all causes, and a 25-34% lower risk of disease specific deaths.”  Good thing if you are following the low-FODMAP diet because you won’t need to rely on cereal for fiber or any packaged food for that matter.  Eating more veggies, fruits, nuts, seeds and wheat-free foods are far more beneficial than eating the types of cereal and other grains that are most consumed and familiar to the general public and unfortunately don’t have the nutritional profile they once did.
If you have the need to feel FULL you can go for low-FODMAP (choose NON-GMO) carbs like these:
  • Quinoa which is low-FODMAP, a seed (not a grain) and it’s a complete protein.  1 cup cooked = 12 grams of dietary fiber!
  • Brown rice – 1 cup cooked = 3.5 grams of dietary fiber
  • Cooked oats (quick dry).  Stick to a 1/4 cup serving = 4 grams of dietary fiber
  • Polenta –  1 cup cooked = 7.3 grams of dietary fiber
  • Buckwheat Kernels – Stick to a 1/8 cup serving = 2.1 grams of dietary fiber
  • Flakes of Corn (gluten free) – 3/4 cup = 4 grams of dietary fiber
I believe the most important step anyone can take is to drink plenty of water and eat foods high in vitamins and nutrients like fruits and veggies, lean proteins and healthy fats.  And if you have IBS, make sure you have both raw and cooked veggies, as just consuming raw could trigger symptoms.Woman Having Abdominal Pain

Soluble vs. Insoluble Fiber

Fruits and vegetables are the best ways to get your soluble (and insoluble) fiber.  There are benefits to both soluble and insoluble fiber, but keep in mind, most HIGH FODMAP foods are made of soluble fiber.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water.  It attracts water and form a gel, which slows down digestion. The emptying of your stomach is delayed and soluble fiber makes you feel full.  Low-FODMAP examples of foods with soluble fiber are: blueberries, oranges, eggplant, carrots, grapefruit (1/4 or less), potatoes; oatmeal (1/4 cup), oat bran, brown rice, tofu, flax and sunflower seeds (2 tablespoons), canned chickpeas (1/4 cup) and canned lentils (1/2 cup).

Insoluble fibers do not dissolve in water and they pass through the gastrointestinal tract relatively intact, and speed up the passage of food and waste through your gut. These are great for people with IBS-C.  Insoluble fibers are considered beneficial fiber for the gut because of the laxative effect and they add bulk to the diet, helping prevent constipation.  Low-FODMAP examples of foods with insoluble fiber are: seeds (2 tablespoons), nuts (no cashews or pistachios), brown rice, zucchini, celery (1/4 stalk), broccoli (1/2 cup), cabbage (common), tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers, green beans, dark leafy vegetables, grapes, and potato skins.

What Types of Supplements May Help Constipation?

If you absolutely have to take a supplement look for those made with Psyllium husk.  It has shown to be effective in treating constipation and IBS symptoms.  Patsy Catsos MS, RDN, LD, Medical Nutrition Therapist and FODMAP expert says: “I tend to recommend those (fiber supplements) made of psyllium husk, starting with a very small serving and increasing slowly over time. Supplements made of cellulose are also worth trying, since cellulose is not fermentable.”  Citrucel  is a good fiber supplement for the low-FODMAP diet because it is non-fermentable.  *I am not a fan of aspartame or maltodextrin (and other synthetic or processed ingredients in Citrucel) so even though it helps IBS, I’d just like to point out that it is not all-natural like organic whole psyllium husk.

Fiber Supplements HIGH in FODMAPs

If you have IBS or another FGID (functional gastrointestinal disorder) and are currently taking a fiber supplement, chances are it may be made with functional fibers like inulin or oligofructose.  These prebiotic ingredients can influence beneficial bacteria to grow and can improve immunity or gastrointestinal health for some, but for people like you and me, it could mean the train has stopped and is not leaving the station…Be aware of fiber supplements made with the following or any packaged food that boasts “High in Fiber” with these ingredients:
  • Inulin – mostly obtained from chicory root or Jerusalem artichoke; chicory root extract.  Inulin is a HIGH FODMAP.
  • Beet fiber, corn fiber, soy fiber, citrus fiber
  • Carrageenan is a water-soluble fiber found in certain types of seaweed.
  • Guar Gum guar seeds are dehusked, milled and screened to obtain the guar gum.  It is used as a thickener and a binder.  Side effects include increased gas production, diarrhea, and loose stools.  Don’t take/useguargumifyouhave a condition that causes obstruction or narrowing of your esophagus or intestine.
    • Some of our fans of Fodmap Life and experts of IBS have said that carrageenan, guar gum and other gums such as acacia, xanthan, and locust bean have caused them symptoms.  You’ll find these in non-dairy milks, snack bars, yogurts and ice cream.  *These have not been analyzed for FODMAPs yet so please do not be confused, as they are not currently on the HIGH FODMAPs list.
  • Other functional fibers that you will find in foods are: pectin, chitosan, cellulose, methylcellulose, beta-gucans, polydextrose, resistant dextrins, fructooligosaccharides (FOS) used as an alternative sweetener, and acacia fibers.
  • In the article “Functional Fibers — Research Shows They Provide Health Benefits Similar to Intact Fibers in Whole Foods” by Constance Brown-Riggs, she says that “research suggests that when added fibers, such as soluble corn fiber, polydextrose, and soluble fiber dextrin (also known as resistant dextrin), are added to foods, they can help consumers increase their fiber intake without concerns about GI distress and, at the same time, confer health benefits associated with naturally occurring intact fiber sources.”  **Patsy Catsos MS, RDN, LD recommends not consuming corn fiber while on the elimination phase of the low-FODMAP diet.
lipex
Ingredient Label for Linex, a Fiber Supplement

Some Low-FODMAP Fiber Sources:Oranges Raspberries Blackberries And Bananas On White

  • Oranges, raspberries, ripe bananas.  Everything pictured above is low-FODMAP BUT the blackberries – just 5 are HIGH in FODMAPs
  • Corn, potatoes (with skin), carrots, spinach
  • Brown rice and brown rice products
  • Rice bran (2 tablespoons)
  • Oatmeal (1/2 cup cooked)
  • Oat bran (2 tablespoons)
  • Quinoa
  • Nuts and nut butters (one handful or 2 tablespoons–no cashews or pistachios)
  • Seeds and seed butters (one handful or 2 tablespoons)
  • Canned, drained, lentils (1/2 cup)
  • Chia seeds, whole or ground (2 tablespoons)
  • Tempeh (3 ounces)

Tips for Getting More Fiber

  • Eat whole low-FODMAP fruits instead of drinking fruit juices (high in FODMAPs).
  • Replace white rice with brown rice products when ever possible
  • When buying gluten-free cereal keep in mind many options are low in fiber, so be sure you have a serving of low-FODMAP fruits with your cereal
  • When you’re bored at work, running around with the kids or on the go, snack on low-FODMAP veggies like carrots.  1 large carrot has 2 grams of dietary fiber.

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Sources: WebMD , Monash University, Patsy Catsos, WebMD (soluble fiber)
The information in this post is not to take the place of your personal physician’s advice and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Discuss this information with your own physician or healthcare provider to determine what is right for you.

Happy Easter! Low-FODMAP Carrot Cake Recipe

How to Make: Low-FODMAP Carrot Cake

Wheat-free, gluten-free, lactose-free and delicious!

WATCH the video!

This recipe is very easy to make and it’s low in FODMAPs.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit

CAKE Ingredients:

1 cup Coconut Oil
1 1/3 cups Brown Sugar
3 Eggs
2 TBS Almond Meal
3 Cups Wheat-Free, Gluten-Free Flour
1 cup chopped Walnuts
4 cups Shredded Carrots
1 tsp Gluten-Free Baking Soda
1 1/2 tsp Allspice

FROSTING Ingredients:

4 TBS Butter
2/3 cup of Lactose-free Cream Cheese
Zest of 1 lemon & juice of 1/2 lemon
4 cups confectioners’ sugar

CAKE Directions:

1. Using a large bowl, beat together oil,
sugar and eggs.
2. Fold in the rest of the ingredients
3. Pour batter into cake pan and bake
on middle shelf for 1 hour 10 minutes
4. Remove from oven and cool on a
wire rack for 20 minutes.

FROSTING Directions:

1. Use an electric mixer and beat
together butter, cream cheese, lemon
zest and juice.
2. Gradually add the confectioners’
sugar, little by little.
3. Spread on top of the cooled carrot
cake.

Hope you enjoy this cake as much as I did – be sure to SHARE with your friends!

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(c) BonCalme LLC All Rights Reserved

Feeling Frustrated? Learn the Differences of Gluten-Free, Wheat-Free for the Low-FODMAP Diet

fodmap diet gluten free wheat freePeople with celiac disease avoid far more foods than people on the low-FODMAP diet.  Celiacs have to stay away from the gluten protein which is found in a wide variety of foods and ingredients.  Celiacs need to avoid gluten because the protein can cause serious intestinal damage and could mean a trip to the hospital- exposure to gluten results in inflammation of the small intestine when any gluten is ingested. Cross-contamination is also a big deal and it’s harder for celiacs to eat out but thankfully gluten-free products made at 100% gluten-free facilities are more widely available.

*Also note that I have IBS as well as the auto-immune disease, Hashimoto’s disease.  People like me have been told to also avoid gluten as many people that have Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism also have gluten-sensitivity.  The book Grain Brain by Dr. Perlmutter says that whole grains “can cause dementia, ADHD, anxiety, chronic headaches, depression” and by avoiding these wheat-based carbs and grains (that have gluten) he says more people might be able to avoid these problems that affect the brain, also including, but not limited to Parkinson’s and Alzheimers.  Do your research to learn more about grains and how they may affect your digestive and brain health.  

FODMAP – Fructans

Wheat has been said to be the largest source of fructans in food here in the U.S.  I believe it as I can name so many of these foods in a heartbeat!  The middle aisles of your grocery stores are filled with wheat products as well as highly processed foods and soy…I am very passionate about those topics and could go on forever but let’s stick to today’s topic.

On the low-FODMAP diet, wheat, barley and rye (which have gluten) contain the carbohydrate FODMAP fructans, so you are essentially negating a specific kind of carbohydrate in the wheat – you are not negating the gluten protein like celiacs need to. Not all gluten-free products are low-FODMAP either.  High FODMAP ingredients that you will see in gluten-free foods are:

  • onions
  • garlic
  • pear juice – or other high FODMAP juices often found in jellies and jams
  • honey
  • chicory, root chicory, chicory root fiber contain inulin (a carbohydrate fiber) – found in chocolate bars, breakfast bars, yogurt, ice cream, salad dressings and margarine
  • dried fruits and more.

Young Woman With OatsAn example of a food that contains gluten but is low in FODMAPs is spelt bread – it is suitable on the diet in low servings.  Oats are often times cross contaminated with gluten. They can be in a celiac’s diet if they are selected from sources that guarantee a lack of contamination by wheat, rye or barley.

Where is Gluten Found?

For celiacs, gluten can be found in ingredients like barley malt, malt vinegar, wheat starch, wheat thickeners and more. Gluten is found in some salad dressings, soy sauce, mustard (like wheat flour), mayonnaise, candy (like wheat flour), yogurt, spice mixes and seasonings. So these food items are dangerous for celiacs but they are not high in fructans and are suitable to include in a low-FODMAP diet.

If you have any questions please comment below!

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Here’s to your health!

Colleen Francioli, Certified Nutritionist & Founder

My Top Posts for the Low-FODMAP Diet, Great for Newbies!

The low-FODMAP diet can be tricky, especially if you do not have the means to work with a Certified Nutritionist or Registered Dietitian familiar with the diet.  If you are working on your own, I have listed some of my most popular posts here to help answer your questions.

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As always if you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to connect with me!  Send me a private message on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fodmaplife

First – you’ll need our Low-FODMAP Grocery List on this page: http://fodmaplife.com/fodmap-grocery-list/ and if you want a printable version, sign up to our email newsletter in the month of March: http://ow.ly/KfnXu 

Now read up on these!

What are other ways you can become oh-so brilliant when following this diet?  

Here’s to your health!

Colleen Francioli, Certified Nutritionist & Founder

colleen frnacioli