Grocery List

Grocery List FODMAP Life copy (1)Get our printable Low-FODMAP Grocery List!  Just click the image at right!

 

I had way too many uncomfortable, challenging and embarrassing experiences and decided one day to conduct a great deal of research.  Then I found the Low-Fodmap Diet.

IBS and Low-FODMAP

Evidence-based research has proved that the Low-FODMAP Diet works for about 70% of people who follow the diet carefully.  It’s best for people with IBS or SIBO who suffer from bloating, distention, gas, abdominal pain, other physical pain and discomfort.  More women then men experience symptoms of IBS and usually experience symptoms around the time of their menstrual cycle.  IBS affects all ages, including children.  It’s estimated that 10 to 15% of the U.S. population experiences IBS and worldwide, it affects 9% to 23% of population. (AboutIBS.org)

If you have low back pain (herniated discs, arthritis, spinal stenosis, spondylitis), fibromyalgia or thyroid disease, you may also be suffering from IBS.

If you’re tired of feeling sick or having too many close calls, take some time to read my blog and reference My Top Posts for the Low-FODMAP Diet, Great for Newbies!, record all food and drinks consumed, as well as bowel movements or any stressful events in a Food & Symptom Diary and use this free Grocery List below as a guide for the next time you go out shopping.  This is not a fad diet, it’s a new way of life, developed by researchers at Monash University.

Get Help

The low-FODMAP diet can be confusing, and there’s a lot of conflicting information online.  You may need a little extra help, and it’s highly recommended that you do reach out to a professional trained in the low-FODMAP diet to ensure you are successful and most of all make healthy choices.  I am a trained Certified Nutritionist Consultant and a graduate of The Low-FODMAP Diet Training Program™. I can help you to implement the low-FODMAP diet for the relief of gastrointestinal symptoms. We will not only cover the diet together, we will also take a good look at your current eating behaviors, stress level and any environmental factors that may be playing a role in your symptoms.  Contact me today for a consultation.

Be sure to join in on the conversation on social media and meet other people who are feeling better!  FacebookTwitter, Instagram, Youtube AND sign up to receive updates, news and tips from my newsletter.

*This list will be updated as new foods are analyzed by Monash University researchers for FODMAPs.  Last update – December 31, 2015

This Low-FODMAP Foods List (below) contains all the delicious foods you can incorporate into your low-FODMAP diet everyday.  Thanks to the research team at the Department of Gastroenterology at Monash University, a smartphone application has been created which provides accurate information about foods that trigger IBS reactions in order to help sufferers manage their symptoms.  You can download the Monash FODMAP App and also keep it with you by accessing your phone at anytime while out to eat, at an event or at the market.  By purchasing the Monash FODMAP App you are also supporting research so more foods can be analyzed and tested for FODMAPs!

Use my list below to go grocery shopping, keep a copy in your bag, at home in your kitchen when making meals, or include with your child’s schoolbag to share with their care providers and teachers.  You may also receive a color PDF version by signing up for my email newsletter here.  Serving sizes have been listed next to each food (all per Monash University – the only source I use).  Remember to balance your plate with fruits (1 serving per meal), veggies, protein, grains and seeds.  And as always, buy organic whenever possible.

Low-FODMAP Foods List

***Please note – In the first parenthesis you will see the low-FODMAP serving size for each food. If you see any food listed as moderate, in the second parenthesis I have listed the moderate serving size and the type of FODMAP it contains.  I also note whether intake should be limited or avoided.  If foods listed do not have a first parenthesis (like Boysenberry) it means there are no low-FODMAP servings for the food. As always, FODMAPs affect everyone differently, so it’s important to keep a Food & Symptom Diary to record any symptoms experienced from food or stress.  My diary also helps you to keep track of bowel movements or other possible triggers.  If you have any questions, please comment below!

Fruit

  • Avocado
(one 1/8 slice of whole avocado)
  • Banana, ripe (1 medium)
  • Banana, dried (10 chips)
  • Blueberries
(20 berries)
  • Boysenberry (5 berries, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake if you malabsorb fructose.
  • Breadfruit (1/2 fruit)
  • Cantaloupe (1/2 cup)
  • Cherries (3, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake if you malabsorb fructose.
  • Cranberry (1 tablespoon dried no sugar added) (2 tablespoons, moderate)
  • Clementine (1 medium)
  • Coconut (1/2 cup) (1 cup moderate)*contains moderate amounts of the Polyol-sorbitol. Limit intake.
  • Dragon Fruit (1 medium)
  • Durian (2 segments)
  • Grapes (1 cup)
  • Grapefruit
(1/2 medium, moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligo-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Kiwi
(2 small, peeled)
  • Lemon
(1 small)
  • Lime
(1 small)
  • Longon
(5)
  • Orange, Mandarin (2 small, peeled)
  • Orange, Navel (1 medium)
  • Melon, Honeydew
(1/2 cup)
  • Passion fruit
(1 whole pulp)
  • Papaya (a.k.a. Paw paw – 1 cup, chopped)
  • Pear, prickly
(1 medium)
  • Pineapple
(1 cup, chopped)
  • Plantain (1 medium, peeled)
  • Pomegranate
(1/4 cup seeds)
  • Rambutan
(2)
  • Raspberry
(10 berries)
  • Rhubarb
(1 cup, chopped)
  • Star fruit
(a.k.a. Carambola, 1 medium)
  • Strawberry
(10 medium, chopped)
  • Tamarind (4 fruits)

Vegetables

  • Artichoke hearts (canned 1/8 cup hearts)
  • Asparagus (1 spear, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake if you malabsorb fructose.
  • Bean sprouts (1/2 cup)
  • Beans, green (12 beans)
  • Beetroot (2 slices) (3 slices, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos (fructans and GOS). Limit intake.
  • Bell Pepper green/red (1/2 cup)
  • Bok choy (1 cup)
  • Broccoli (1/2 cup) (2/3 cup, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of the Polyol-sorbitol. Limit intake.
  • Brussels sprouts (2 sprouts)
  • Butternut Squash (1/4 cup diced) (1/2 cup diced, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of the Polyols-mannitol and Oligos-GOS. Limit intake.
  • Cabbage, red/common (1 cup)
  • Callaloo (tinned in brine, 4 pieces)
  • Carrot (1 medium)
  • Cassava (1/2 cup diced)(3/4 cup diced, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS. Limit intake.
  • Celeriac (1/2 medium stalk)
  • Celery (1/4 medium stalk) (1/2 medium, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of the Polyols-mannitol. Avoid moderate amount if you malabsorb mannitol.
  • Chicory leaves (1/2 cup)
  • Chili green/red (11cm long)
  • Chives (1 tablespoon)
  • Cho cho (1/2 cup)
  • Choko (1/2 cup diced)
  • Choy sum (1 cup chopped)
  • Collard greens (1 cup chopped)
  • Corn, sweet (1/2 cob) (3/4 cob moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS and the Polyol-sorbitol. Limit intake.
  • Cucumber, common (1/2 cup)
  • Eggplant (1/2 cup)
  • Endive (4 leaves)
  • Fennel (1/2 cup bulb)
  • Gai Lan (1 cup chopped)
  • Galangal (1 x 3.5 cm piece)
  • Ginger root (1 teaspoon)
  • Kale (1 cup chopped)
  • Karela (1/4 sliced, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS. Limit intake.
  • Leek (1/2 leek)
  • Leek (1/2 cup chopped leaves)
  • Lettuce, all (1 cup)
  • Olives green/black (15 small)
  • Parsnip (1/2 cup)
  • Seaweed, nori (2 sheets)
  • Sweet potato (1/2 cup) (3/4 cup, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Polyol-mannitol. Avid if you malabsorb mannitol.
  • Potato (1 medium)
  • Pumpkin, butternut (1/4 cup) (1/2 cup diced, moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Polyols-mannitol and Oligos-GOS. Limit intake.
  • Pumpkin, canned (1/4 cup) (1/2 cup moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans and GOS. Limit intake.
  • Pumpkin, jap (1/2 cup diced)
  • Radish (2)
  • Silverbeet (1 cup chopped)
  • Spaghetti squash (cooked, 1 cup)
  • Spinach, baby (1 cup)
  • Squash (2 squash)
  • Swiss chard (1 cup chopped)
  • Taro (1/2 cup diced)
  • Tomato, canned (1/2 cup)
  • Tomato, cherry (4)
  • Tomato, common (1 small)
  • Tomato, roma (1 small)
  • Tomato, sundried (4 pieces)
  • Turnip (1 cup diced)
  • Water chestnuts (1/2 cup sliced)
  • Witlof (4 leaves)
  • Yam (1 cup diced)
  • Zucchini (1/2 cup chopped)

Nuts, Seeds

  • Almonds (up to 10)
  • Chestnuts (20 boiled)
  • Hazelnuts (up to 10) (20 nuts moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS and fructans. Limit intake.
  • Linseed, sunflower, almond mix (1 tablespoon)
  • Macadamia (20)
  • Mixed nuts (18 assorted nuts)
  • Brazil nuts (10)
  • Peanuts (32)
  • Pecans (10 halves)
  • Pine nuts (1 tablespoon)
  • Chia seeds (black/white 2 tablespoons)
  • Egusi seeds (2 tablespoons) (3 tablespoons moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans and GOS. Limit intake.
  • Poppy seeds (black/white 2 tablespoons)
  • Pumpkin seeds (2 tablespoons)
  • Sesame seeds (1 tablespoon)
  • Sunflower (2 teaspoons, hulled)
  • Walnuts (10 halves)
  • Nut or seed butters (2 tablespoons)

Pulses, Legumes, Vegetarian Substitutes

  • Butter beans, canned (1/4 cup) (3 tablespoons moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS. Limit intake.
  • Chana dal, boiled (1/2 cup)
  • Chickpeas, canned (1/4 cup) (1/2 cup moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS. Limit intake.
  • Lentils, canned (1/2 cup)
  • Lentils, green and red, boiled (1/4 cup) (1/2 cup moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS and fructans. Limit intake.
  • Lima beans, boiled (1/4 cup) (1/3 cup moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS and fructans. Limit intake.
  • Mung beans, boiled (1/4 cup)
  • Urid dal, boiled (1/2 cup)
  • Mince, quorn (75 g, 2 ½ oz.)
  • Tempeh, plain (1 slice 100g)
  • Tofu, plain (2/3 cup, cubed)

Lactose-free Alternatives, Cheese and Dairy

  • Almond milk (1 cup)
  • Coconut milk, canned (1/2 cup)
  • Coconut (UHT-ultra high temperature) (1/2 cup) (150 ml, moderate)
  • Oat milk (1/8 cup)
  • Hemp milk (1 cup)
  • Soy milk (soy protein 1 cup)
  • Soya milk unsweetened (hulled soya beans) (1/4 cup) (1/2 cup moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS. Limit intake.

Cheese

  • Brie (2 wedges)
  • Camembert (2 wedges)
  • Cheddar (2 slices)
  • Colby (2 slices)
  • Cottage (4 tablespoons)
  • Cream cheese (2-4 tablespoons moderate) *contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Feta (1/2 cup crumbled)
  • Goat (1/2 cup crumbled)
  • Haloumi (2 slices)
  • Havarti (2 slices) (4 slices moderate) )*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Mozzarella (1/2 cup grated)
  • Pecorino (1/2 cup grated)
  • Ricotta (2 tablespoons) (4 moderate) )*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Swiss (2 slices)

Dairy

  • Cream, pure (regular 1/4 cup, moderate) )*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Ice cream (1 scoop, moderate)*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Sour cream (1/4 cup moderate)*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Whipped cream (1/2 cup)
  • Yogurt lactose-free (6 ounces about 1 small tub)
  • Yogurt lactose-free, strawberry (6 ounces about 1 small tub)
  • Yogurt lactose-free, vanilla flavored (3 ounces about 1/2 tub) *contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.

Confectionary

  • Chocolate, dark (5 squares/30 g)
  • Chocolate, milk (1 fun size bar) (5 squares moderate)*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Chocolate, white (1 fun size bar) (5 squares moderate)*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.

Sugars and Sweeteners

  • Jaggery (Sri Lanka ½ tablespoon)
  • Stevia powder (2 sachets)
  • Sugar, brown (1 tablespoon)
  • Sugar, palm (1 tablespoon)
  • Sugar, raw (1 tablespoon)
  • Sugar, white (1 tablespoon)
  • Maple syrup (2 tablespoons)
  • Rice malt syrup (1 tablespoon)
  • Treacle, coconut (1/2 tablespoon)(1 tablespoon moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.

Fats and Oils

  • Butter (1 tablespoon)
  • Dairy blend 70% butter, 30% oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Margarine (1 tablespoon)
  • Mayonnaise low and regular fat (2 tablespoons)
  • Avocado oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Canola oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Coconut oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Olive oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Peanut oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Rice bran oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Sesame oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Sunflower oil
  • Vegetable oil (1 tablespoon)

Meats and Fish

  • Beef (1 small fillet)
  • Chicken (1 small fillet)
  • Eggs (2)
  • Fish (100 g cooked)
  • Kangaroo (1 small fillet)
  • Lamb (1 small fillet)
  • Pork (1 small fillet)
  • Prawns, peeled (10)
  • Salmon, plain, canned in brine (105g drained)
  • Sardines, plain, canned in oil (110g drained)
  • Tuna, plain, canned in brine (185g drained)
  • Tuna, plain, canned in oil (185g drained)

Cereals

  • Amaranth, puffed (1/4 cup)
  • Flakes of corn (gluten-free, 1 cup)
  • Granola with honey (1/4 cup)
  • Quinoa flakes (1 cup)
  • Rice flakes (1/4 cup)
  • Rice, puffed/popped (1/2 cup)
  • Oats, quick dry (1/4 cup)

Breads & Tortillas

  • Gluten-free (2 slices)
  • Gluten-free, white (2 slices)
  • Gluten-free, wholemeal (2 slices)
  • Gluten-free high fiber (1 slice) (2 slices moderate)*contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake.
  • Gluten-free, multi-grain (1 slice) (1 1/2 slices moderate) *contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake.
  • Gluten-free, multi-grain, sprouted (1 slice)(2 slices moderate)*contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake.
  • Multi-grain, sprouted (1 slice)
  • Millet (2 slices)
  • Rice chia, gluten-free (1 slice) (2 slices moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Sourdough, oat (1 slice) (2 slices moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans and GOS. Limit intake.
  • Sourdough, 100% spelt (2 slices)
  • Spelt, 100% spelt flour (1 slice moderate)*contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake.
  • Wheat, white (1 slice) (1 1/2 slices moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Wheat, white, sourdough (2 slices)
  • Wheat, wholegrain (1 slice moderate)*contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit if you malabsorb fructose.
  • Wheat, wholemeal (1 slice) (1 1/2 slices)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Wheat, wholemeal, sourdough (2 slices)
  • Tortillas, corn (2)

Grains

  • Bourghal, cooked (1/4 cup)
  • Bran, oat, unprocessed (2 tablespoons)
  • Bran, rice, unprocessed (2 tablespoons)
  • Bran, wheat, processed (1/2 tablespoon)
  • Bran, wheat, unprocessed (1/2 tablespoon)
  • Buckwheat groats, cooked (U.S., 3/4)
  • Buckwheat kernels, cooked (1/8 cup)
  • Cous cous, rice, corn, cooked (1/4 cup)
  • Millet, hulled, cooked (1 cup)
  • Noodles, rice stick, cooked (1 cup)
  • Pasta, gluten-free, cooked (1 cup)
  • Pasta, quinoa, cooked (1 cup)
  • Pasta, spelt, cooked (1/2 cup)
  • Polenta, cornmeal, cooked (1 cup)
  • Quinoa, black, red, white, cooked (1 cup)
  • Rice, basmati, cooked (1 cup)
  • Rice, brown, white, cooked (1 cup)

Snacks

  • Biscuit/cookie, chocolate chip (1) (1 1/2 biscuits moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Biscuit/cookie, cream filled (1) (2 moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Biscuit, savoury plain or wholemeal (2)
  • Biscuit, shortbread (1) (2 moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Biscuit, sweet, plain (2)
  • Chips, corn, plain (small packet)
  • Chips, potato, plain (small packet)
  • Chips, potato straws, salted (small packet)
  • Corn thins, flavored, sour cream and chives (1)
  • Crackers, saltines (U.S., 5)
  • Pretzels (1/2 cup rings)
  • Rice cakes, flavored, sour cream and chives (1)
  • Rice cakes, plain (2)

 

Flours

  • Almond, meal (1/4 cup)
  • Flour, buckwheat (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, buckwheat, wholemeal (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, corn (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, maize (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, millet (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, quinoa (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, rice (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, rice, roasted (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, sorghum (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, spelt, organic, sieved (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, teff (2/3 cup)
  • Flour, yam, pounded (2/3 cup)
  • Starch, maize (2/3 cup)
  • Starch, potato (2/3 cup)
  • Starch, tapioca (2/3 cup)

Beverages

Fruit or Vegetable

  • Coconut water, fresh (100 ml) (163ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of the Polyol-sorbitol and Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Coconut water, packaged (100 ml) (150ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of the Polyol-sorbitol. Limit intake.
  • Cranberry (1 glass/250 ml)
  • Orange, 99% blend, reconstituted, fresh (1/2 glass/125 ml)(3/4 glass moderate)*contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Limit intake if you malabsorb fructose.
  • Vegetable blend, tomato juice base (1 glass/200 ml)

Coffee

*Caffeine when consumed in excess can also aggravate the gut and trigger symptoms. Remember caffeine is also present in chocolate.

  • Espresso, decaf with low-FODMAP milk (1 shot/30 ml)
  • Espresso, decaf, black (2 shots/60 ml)
  • Espresso, regular with low-FODMAP milk (1 shot/30 ml)
  • Instant, decaf with low-FODMAP milk (2 teaspoons and 100 ml milk)
  • Instant, decaf, black (2 teaspoons)
  • Instant, regular with low-FODMAP milk (2 teaspoons and 100 ml milk)
  • Instant, regular, black (2 teaspoons)

Tea

*Caffeine when consumed in excess can also aggravate the gut and trigger symptoms. Remember caffeine is also present in chocolate.

  • Black, strong with cow’s milk (250 ml)
  • Black, strong with low-FODMAP milk (250 ml)
  • Black, strong with soy milk-soy beans (180 ml moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans and GOS. Limit intake.
  • Black, strong with water (180 ml) (250ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Black, weak with water (250 ml)
  • Black, weak with cow’s milk (250 ml)
  • Black, weak with low-FODMAP milk (250 ml)
  • Black, weak with soymilk (soy beans) (250 ml)
  • Chai, weak with water (250 ml)
  • Chai, strong made with water (180 ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Chai, strong made with low-FODMAP milk (180 ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans and GOS. Limit intake.
  • Chai, weak with cow’s milk (250 ml)
  • Chai, weak with low-FODMAP milk (250 ml)
  • Chai, weak with soymilk (soy beans) (180 ml) (250 ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS. Intake should be avoided.
  • Chamomile, weak made with water (180 ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Dandelion, weak with water (250 ml)
  • Dandelion, strong with water (180 ml)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Green, strong with water (250 ml)
  • Herbal, weak with water (180 ml) (250 ml moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Peppermint, strong with water (250 ml)
  • White, strong made with water (250 ml)

Alcohol

  • Wine – Red, Sparkling, Sweet, White, Dry – (1/2 glass/75 ml to 1 glass/150 ml)
  • Beer – (1/2 can/188 ml) or (1 can/375 ml)
  • Gin – (1/2 serving/15 ml) or (1 serving/30 ml)
  • Vodka – (1/2 serving/15 ml) or (1 serving/30 ml)
  • Whiskey – (1/2 serving/15 ml) or (1 serving/30 ml)

Chocolate Beverages

  • Cacao powder (2 heaped teaspoons)
  • Carob powder (1 heaped teaspoon) (1 1/2 heaped tablespoons moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Cocoa powder (2 heaped teaspoons)
  • Drinking Chocolate 23% cocoa powder (2 heaped teaspoons)
  • Drinking Chocolate 60% cocoa powder (2 heaped teaspoons)
  • Drinking Chocolate 70% cocoa powder (2 heaped teaspoons)
  • Malted, Chocolate Flavored Beverage (1.5 heaped teaspoons)(3 heaped teaspoons moderate) *contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.

Other

  • Protein supplement, plant based (U.S., 1 sachet) 

Condiments

Sauces and Spreads

  • Asafoetida/Asafetida Powder/Hing (*wheat-free 1/4 teaspoon)
  • Barbeque sauce (2 tablespoons)
  • Cream sauce, pasta (1/4 cup moderate) *contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Fish sauce (1 tablespoon)
  • Ketchup with HFCS (U.S., 1 sachet) (1 1/2 sachets moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Ketchup with sucrose U.S., 1 sachet) (1 1/2 sachets moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Miso paste (2 sachets)
  • Oyster sauce (1 tablespoon)
  • Pesto sauce (1/2 tablespoon) (1 tablespoon moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Quince paste (1/2 tablespoon) (1 tablespoon moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Shrimp paste (2 teaspoons)
  • Soy sauce (2 tablespoons)
  • Sweet and sour sauce (2 tablespoons)
  • Tamarind paste (Sri Lanka ½ tablespoon)
  • Tomato sauce (2 sachets)
  • Balsamic vinegar (1 tablespoon) (2 tablespoons moderate) *contains moderate amounts of excess fructose. Intake should be limited if you malabsorb fructose.
  • Rice wine vinegar (2 tablespoons)
  • Worcestershire sauce (2 tablespoons)

Dips and Spreads

  • Caviar dip (1 tablespoon moderate)*contains moderate amounts of lactose. Limit intake if you malabsorb lactose.
  • Eggplant dip (2 tablespoons)
  • Hummus/Hommus dip (1 tablespoon moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS and fructans. Limit intake.
  • Tahini paste (1 tablespoon) (1 1/2 tablespoons moderate) *contains moderate amounts of Oligos- fructans. Limit intake.
  • Jam, marmalade (2 tablespoons)
  • Jam, mixed berries (1 tablespoon moderate)*
  • Jam, strawberry (2 tablespoons)
  • Peanut butter (2 tablespoons)
  • Vegemite (1 teaspoon)

Mustard/Pickles

  • Capers in vinegar (1 tablespoon)
  • Capers, salted (1 tablespoon)
  • Chutney (1 tablespoon)
  • Mustard (1 tablespoon)
  • Relish (1 tablespoon) (1 1/2 tablespoons moderate)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans. Limit intake.
  • Vegetable relish (1 tablespoon)
  • Wasabi (1 teaspoon)

Fresh Herbs

  • Basil (1 cup)
  • Cilantro (1 cup)
  • Coriander (1 cup)
  • Curry leaves (1 cup)
  • Fenugreek leaves (1 cup)
  • Gotukala (1/2 bundle)
  • Lemongrass (1 x 10 cm stalk)
  • Pandan leaves (1 x 2.5 cm leaf)
  • Parsley (1 cup)
  • Rampa leaves (1 x 2.5 cm leaf)
  • Rosemary (1 cup)
  • Tarragon (1 cup)
  • Thyme (1 cup)

Spices

  • All spice (1 teaspoon)
  • Cardamom (1 teaspoon)
  • Chilli powder (1 teaspoon)
  • Cinnamon (1 teaspoon)
  • Cloves (1 teaspoon)
  • Coriander seeds (1 teaspoon)
  • Cumin (1 teaspoon)
  • Curry powder (1 teaspoon)
  • Fennel seeds (1 teaspoon)
  • Fenugreek seeds (2 tablespoons)
  • Five spice (1 teaspoon)
  • Goraka (1 average piece)
  • Mustard seeds (1 teaspoon)
  • Nutmeg (1 teaspoon)
  • Paprika (1 teaspoon)
  • Pepper, black (1 teaspoon)
  • Saffron (1 packet)
  • Star anise (2 cloves)
  • Turmeric (1 teaspoon)

Extra Notes

  • Lentils, canned  *Canned legumes are LOW because the FODMAPs Oligos-GOS and fructans leach out of the bean.  Lentils (green & red) boiled are LOW
  • Pumpkin – canned U.S. pumpkin has moderate amounts of FODMAPs.  1/4 C LOW, 1/2 C MODERATE
  • Spaghetti Squash – 1 serve (1 cooked cup) and a ½ serve (½ cooked cup)ounces LOW
  • Summer Squash LOW, Butternut 1/4 C diced
  • Tomatoes (all) LOW, Sundried 2 pieces
  •  Cranberry
    • If consuming dried, 1 TBS or less is low fodmap
  •  Coconut
    • Coconut milk (canned) allowed – 1/2 C portion per meal/snack
    • Coconut water allowed – small quantities, less than 1/4 C per meal/snack
    • Shredded dried coconut – allowed in 1/4 C per meal/snack
  • Meat and Beef – remember with all protein a serving should be the size of your fist.  I do not handle red meat very well, and it can be hard for people with IBS to digest.  So if you like red meat, write down how you feel after eating it and remember the portion size.  Always know what’s in your meat 🙂  Make sure no hidden FODMAPs have been added (like dried fruits, bread crumbs).  Grass-fed beef is always the best choise.
  • Protein Powders: Choose egg white, rice, whey protein isolate or whey protein concentrate only if it is lactose free.

Vegan Protein:

  • Tempeh (1 C = 31 grams of protein)
  • Tofu (1 C = 20 grams of protein)
  • Nuts, nut and seed butters (no pistachios or cashews).   No more than a handful of nuts and seeds or 2 TB of nut or seed butters in a meal (re: Dr. Shepherd/Dr. Gibson).
  • Quinoa  (1 C = more than 8 grams of protein).  It includes the nine essential amino acids needed by your body for growth and repair.

 Fats & Oils:

  • Vegetable oils – Get cold pressed and organic when ever possible.  My favorite oils: extra virgin olive oil (look for brands that include a harvest date to ensure freshness – imported olive oils can sometimes be a few years old), avocado oil (high in monounsaturated fats, good for cooking as well), grapeseed oil (high in mono- and polyunsaturates and has a high smoke point), sunflower oil (mild-flavored, high in vitamin E, look for the high-oleic version), safflower (high in monounsaturates and has a high smoke point; look for high-oleic version).
  • Margarine (its a highly processed food that was invented to replace butter.  It is often hydrogenated.  So you can have margarine but I recommend staying away from it)
  • Garlic-infused oil (onion and garlic substitute)

Dairy Alternatives:

  • Gelato and sorbets (made from Low FODMAP fruits and sweeteners and not made with mixed fruits)

Breads, Grains:

  • Sourdough Breads (made from lower FODMAP flours such as spelt and oat) are classed as low or moderate in FODMAP content. Stay away from sourdough made with high FODMAP flours (such as wheat and rye).

Spreads & Condiments:

  • BBQ sauce – onion and garlic free only.  Read label for other possible high FODMAPs like High Fructose Corn Syrup, honey or others.
  • Ketchup – (USA)- 1 serve sweetened with sucrose OR sweetened with high fructose corn syrup (2 sachets, 0.90 ounces or 26 grams) is HIGH.  1 sachet, 0.45 ounces or 13 grams of either kind is LOW. Tomato sauce (AUS) 1/2 serve to 1 serve is LOW.  Large quantities of tomato sauce (26 grams or 4 sachets) contains moderate amounts of Oligos-fructans, intake should be limited.
  • *Jelly contains excess free fructose if it is made with high fructose corn syrup, or has fructose or fruit juice concentrate as a main ingredient.  Jam and marmalade in very small quantities is OK but beware of those that say “100% fruit spreads” as they are most likely made with pear juice.
  • Mayonnaise (try Vegenaise for a non-dairy version)
  • Pesto sauce – 1/2 TBS LOW
  • Relish – 1 TBS LOW
  • Soy sauce (choose gluten-free version if you have Celiac Disease)
  • Sweet chili sauce, garlic-free
  • Vinegar, rice wine; vinegar balsamic 1 TBS LOW
  • Hot sauce (don’t use too much if you have IBS)

Sweeteners & Sweets:

  • Treacle – this is any uncrystallized syrup made during the refining of sugar.  The most common forms of treacle are the pale syrup known as golden syrup and the darker syrup usually referred to as dark or black treacle. Dark treacle has a distinctively strong, slightly bitter flavor, and a richer color than golden syrup, yet not as dark as molasses (thank you Wikipedia).
  • Chocolate – (as reported by Monash University)
    • Dark chocolate (low fodmap) 1 serving = 5 squares or 30 g
    • Milk chocolate (moderate fodmap) 1 serving = 5 squares or 30 g – Lactose is the fodmap
    • White chocolate (moderate fodmap) 1 serving = 5 squares or 30 g – Lactose is the fodmap
  • Avoid large servings of chocolate. Chocolate is high in fat, and when consumed in excess can affect gut motility and may trigger symptoms.
  • Avoid carob chocolate. Carob powder is high in oligos (fructans), and much higher than cocoa powder.

Check back often and please comment below with any questions! Thank you, Colleen

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248 thoughts on “Grocery List”

  1. Colleen
    I recently spoke to several folks who claim that having “bone broth” daily is extremely helpful for IBS symptoms. I do not see that anywhere on your blog. Can you please comment?

    1. hi, I´m Mary ,I got a question ,please. when you talk about biscuits or cookies, do you mean made with wheat flour ? so, it means that we can take small quantities of wheat and gluten ? and one more, in my country every single rice toast and cracker are made with powdered milk, are they safe ? thank you !! please reply !!!

  2. Hi Colleen,
    I read somewhere that cauliflower was ok if very smooth (pureed) like baby food consistency and could be tolerated in this form based on no fibrous or stalky pieces remaining, can you advise? I ask because I use this in place of potatoes for mash, well used to before I read the FODMAP grocery list etc. Thanks!

    1. Hi Emma, Where did you read this and were they applying it to the low-FODMAP diet? Cauliflower is high in FODMAPs, even at a small serving of a 1/4 cup. However, if you know you do not malabsorb the Polyol mannitol, cauliflower may not cause you symptoms. You can always try and tiny amount and keep a record if you experienced any symptoms. Please be sure to sign up for my email newsletter! goo.gl/Rrr8DD

  3. Thanks Colleen. I will try it again and see if I have symptoms. I believe it was a paleo article that I was reading. So I may have misread it or it may of course not be pure FODMAP related. Can you be tested for polyol malabsorption btw? Thanks. I’d be curious as I get so much gas with IBS no matter what I eat and I do follow the FODMAP list very closely.

    1. Hi there, I just took a look at Emergen-C Immune + Super Orange and the first ingredient is fructose. If you know you do not malabsorb fructose then you can continue eating foods with fructose. Otherwise I would avoid it during the Elimination Phase. Also coconut water (packaged) is low at 100ml which translates to 3.38 ounces. So you are having much more than you are supposed to, however again, the FODMAP here is the Polyol-sorbitol. As long as you know you do not malabsorb sorbitol you can continue enjoying coconut water. Hope this helps!

  4. I seem to be unable to tolerate coconut oil milk etc. leave me a little bilious but small amounts of coconut shredded seems ok. Is this normal ?

    1. Hi Brigitte, Nothing can really be classified as “normal” for anyone with IBS because we all react differently to food, stress and our environment. Since coconut oil/milk/shredded are all processed differently and come from different parts of the coconut it could just be that shredded coconut might not be causing you an issue because of the higher amount of fiber and the way it’s processed, but that’s just an assumption. It’s best to just stick with what works and keep notes on what does not. Are you planning on doing the Challenge phase?

    1. Hi Emma, Nothing as of yet but I do use it myself. Nutritional yeast is deactivated yeast (yeast is low-FODMAP) made from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is grown on molasses (molasses is low-FODMAP) and goes through a process in which it is killed to “deactivate” it. If you like nutritional yeast you should know it has not been formerly analyzed for FODMAP content, but it might be something you try in a small amount to measure your tolerance or you can add to your diet after completing both phases.

  5. I get a bit confused where to write in order to get a comment reply. So I will try again here. I have written (somewhere on this site) to ask what your opinion is on Bone Broth. I have heard so much about it and I am trying it now. I bought some at a store, which I thought was tasteless and very unappealing. Then I made some, which was really a pain. And now I have a great source to buy some which is homemade (in Baltimore) and it is so much better. But I wanted to know your thoughts. Is it just a trend? Is it FODMAP friendly? How much should I eat in a day?

    1. Hi Leslie, Thanks for your patience. I receive hundreds of questions every week and truly do my best to get to them. So to answer your question, yes bone broth can be low-FODMAP, it just depends on the ingredients used. You can’t use onion and if you use celery, just a 1/4 medium stalk is low in FODMAPs. You’ll need to check over ingredients and recommended low serving sizes. I have heard many good things about it and will be trying it myself this weekend and sharing a recipe soon.

  6. Thanks so much. I don’t mind being patient. I think you are amazing. I just wanted to be sure that I was following the correct protocol for writing in. I think the bone broth has value but some products on the market just don’t taste good to me. Lately, I have been adding a bit of roasted turkey meat, or some steamed zucchini or even a few chunks of baked potato to make it more palatable. I will stop for a few days to have a stool analysis done and then begin again.
    Thanks again for your dedication to this site EVEN after a baby!!!

  7. Are there any sodas safe to drink? Birch beer? My husband is having a hard time acclimating to this food change. It’s taken him years to accept that he needs to change his eating habits in order to feel better… But he’s REALLY missing soda. Any suggestions?
    Thanks!!

    1. Hi Jill, The thing is, soda *might* be what is causing your husband trouble. The carbonation doesn’t help with IBS. My husband likes soda too but he never feels good after drinking it, let alone the fact that most sodas are made with HFCS. When you look at natural sodas, they are healthier but most are made with a sugar alcohol called erythritol which may also cause him some grief. Has he tried making different flavored waters? Or how about coconut water? He’ll need to stick to 100 ml which is low-FODMAP: http://amzn.to/1WORHTI

    1. Hi there, Well apples are high in FODMAPs and white chocolate is moderate in FODMAPs, so consider staying away from those. Dark chocolate covered rice cakes may work – it depends on the ingredients! Also if it says “natural apple flavor” the FDA does not require companies to list what those natural flavors are derived from or their content. So even if a rice cake is not made with actual apples, you still don’t know what’s in that flavoring. Try organic
      cinnamon flavored rice cakes instead: http://amzn.to/1WOQQ5G

  8. I have sever diarrhea predominant IBS
    I am following the low for map diet strictly
    Used to work great but it is not as good as before
    I was investigated for a lot of other medical problems it turns to be just IBS
    Even minimal use of foods intermediate in FOD MAP triggers bad diarrhea
    I have constant feeling of incomplete emptying
    The only thing I guess could be a contributing factor is Coffee
    1-2 cups per day
    Any suggestion

  9. Hi, I have a moderate case of IBD (Crohns/Colitis) and I was wondering if this diet would be suitable for me to try? Any time I have a flare up I am automatically placed on a low residue diet, which does work to calm symptoms for a while, but is not very healthy. I am really eager to eat healthy, but not aggravate my tummy. Wholegrain foods, and wheat seem to be a big problem for me, and I believe vegetables (like cabbage) may have been the cause of a more recent flare up.
    I’m getting a little frustrated, as I am restricted to very plain foods which aren’t very healthy for “normal” people. I would be really grateful for any advice you could suggest. Many thanks, Eve

      1. Hi Colleen, Thank you for replying so quickly.
        I’m actually just out of my flare. They can sometimes be quick at a couple of weeks, which is when I go straight to eating very plainly and focusing on getting better. I have just had enough of the “low residue” diet as it doesn’t seem good for a long-term solution. Although I can completely understand why I wouldn’t be able to try something so new when I would be in a flare-up.

  10. I’m a little confused about carob powder. Is 1 teaspoon okay once a day or a couple times a week, or should it be avoided all together? I am working to manage several autoimmune conditions and for the next few months I am devoted to an AIP/Paleo and Low-FODMAP diet. I would like to make the AIP version of coffee which includes dandelion root tea, chicory and carob powder. Will this be okay? Being on such a restricted diet is hard and I look forward to the small things 🙂 Thank you!

    1. Hi, Since carob powder does come with a moderate serving as well (1 1/2 heaped teaspoons) it’s advised to have just one low-FODMAP serving of it per day. You may also test your own tolerance to see if having another teaspoon later on in the day triggers any symptoms- remember we are all different in how we handle FODMAPs. Dandelion tea (1 cup/250 ml) made weak with water is low but chicory is a high-FODMAP so the answer is no, but again, you can always try it making the dandelion tea weak, keeping to 1 teaspoon carob and a low serving of chicory and see how you do.

  11. Thank you so much for this! What about cooking with cayenne pepper? I feel
    Like I saw that was okay and wanted to double check. Thanks!

  12. Green, red, and yellow peppers kill me!! Why are they on the safe list? Peppers, onions, and garlic have been giving me problems ALL my life. My parents thought I was picky. Aside from not liking the taste my intestines didn’t like them either. Whole wheat products don’t agree with me but processed wheat products do just fine…actually make me regular. We’re all different. Apples and pears are the other two culprits. Other fruit don’t bother me. Broccoli and cauliflower started bothering me after I learned to like them roasted. I never liked them before then. Picky taste buds…now I think that if you we don’t like the taste, our intestines properly don’t like them either! Listen to your body…if you’re called picky, so be it!!!

  13. Hi,
    Thanks for the extensive list. But how come all food is marked with limited amount? I mean I thought eggs and potatoes would at least be safe to consume in any amount? I also wonder on what foods can I rely when I am still hungry after a meal?

    Thankyou
    Sylvia

    1. Hi Sylvia, If they are not market as moderate in FODMAPs and are low (read my instructions) those are just recommended standard serving sizes for a balanced diet. The key to a healthy diet for anyone is to balance your plate (or snacks) with vegetables, fruits, protein, seeds, nuts and in the low-FODMAP diet, lactose free or low lactose foods. Does that help?

  14. Hi Colleen. I need help with stews and soups sow all the family can enjoy the meal . What to do when it comes to onions or celery or garlic . Thank you Georgie

    1. Hi Georgie, You should make your own at home and use garlic-infused oil or you can saute onions or garlic in oil for a few minutes, being sure to remove them before adding other ingredients. They’re not soluble in oil -so the FODMAPs don’t leech out. Asafetida powder is another substitute (get a wheat-free version) but I think the latter methods are better for stews.

  15. I’m hoping that somewhere it will be pointed out how bad soy is for endocrine and reproductive health…especially for women. The rest of this list is great! I’m glad you mention staying away from things simply because they aren’t healthy! It’s so important to not just eat blindly what our bodies will tolerate, but to eat what is good for our bodies! Thank you SO MUCH for all of this fantastic information! 🙂

  16. Thank you for this informative site it’s fab . I have had painful lower abdominal flare ups for 3 years had endoscopy and barium enema but all clear .. My stomach is so bloated I feel I look six months pregnant and I can’t shift it also my stomach feels so distended it’s uncomfortable ..it’s this normal for gluten intolerance ?? So I have decided to follow this diet .. Do you feel it may work
    Many thanks Wendy

    1. Hi Wendy, the diet works for around 70% of people who try it (successfully, following the diet the correct way and usually with support). I am not sure what might actually be causing your abdominal pain but yes, wheat in gluten products has been known to trigger those symptoms. It’s wise to keep a Food & Symptom Diary to monitor everything you eat, drink, your bowel movements, any stress – then you can get a more accurate understanding of your triggers. It might or might not be more than just gluten.

  17. I’ve been diagnosed with IBS and am just starting the elimination phase of the Fodmap diet. Up to this point, I’ve been eliminating foods from my diet that I believe to trigger my IBS (oatmeal, nut butters, almonds, rice cakes), but I’m not 100% sure if those are the culprits. Should I add them back in (in moderation) since they are low Fodmap? Thanks!

    1. Yes you can add them back in but be sure to follow serving sizes. Example- almonds are low, but at 10 nuts/serving. Oatmeal is low but at a 1/4 cup dry serving. I personally don’t eat oatmeal anymore because it caused such horrible gas.

  18. Hi there! Thanks for this great article 🙂 it says for shredded coconut 1/4 cup but do you know how much coconut butter would be ok? Or would that be same as shredded .. Thankyou:)

  19. I’m brand new at this whole thing. I was diagnosed with gastroparesis a few weeks ago. Went on that very difficult diet…no fresh fruit or veggies…a lot of white bread, applesauce with very little nutritional value and no fiber. It didn’t help at all. Now I’m starting the fodmap diet which is practically opposite from the gastro diet. I’m not sure where to start.

  20. This might sound silly but are the serving suggestions per meal or per day? Is it okay to mix two together like peanut butter and celery? I’m so miserable and I need to get my ibs under control. 😦

    1. Hi Robyn, When something has a moderate FODMAP rating, it’s best to enjoy once /day to be on the safe side. Peanut butter is not a FODMAP (unless made with a high-FODMAP like honey) so pairing it with celery would be OK. Stick with a 1/4 stalk of celery max.

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