My Top Posts for the Low-FODMAP Diet, Great for Newbies!

The low-FODMAP diet can be tricky, especially if you do not have the means to work with a Certified Nutritionist or Registered Dietitian familiar with the diet.  If you are working on your own, I have listed some of my most popular posts here to help answer your questions.

Designed by www.designkf.com
Designed by http://www.designkf.com

 

As always if you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to connect with me!  Send me a private message on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fodmaplife

First – you’ll need our Low-FODMAP Grocery List on this page: http://fodmaplife.com/fodmap-grocery-list/ and if you want a printable version, sign up to our email newsletter in the month of March: http://ow.ly/KfnXu 

Now read up on these!

What are other ways you can become oh-so brilliant when following this diet?  

Here’s to your health!

Colleen Francioli, Certified Nutritionist & Founder

colleen frnacioli

Advertisements

Wheat, Barley, Rye, Onions and Garlic – Why They Trigger Symptoms of IBS

Wheat, Barley, Rye, Onions and Garlic – Why They Trigger Symptoms of IBS

Instead of resulting to pharma drugs, this elimination diet uses “food as medicine” to help people discover which foods may be triggering symptoms.  A group of sugars called FODMAPs are poorly absorbed in the small intestine and research suggests they contribute to IBS and FGID symptoms.  Learn more and read on!

Wheat FreeWheat, barley and rye as well as onions and garlic contain fructans which are part of the FODMAPs family.  Fructans are malabsorbed in the small intestine which means they aren’t digested properly and then ferment in the small intestine causing bloating, gas, constipation and diarrhea.  Of all the FODMAPs, fructans are the greatest contributor to IBS as humans were not made to have the enzymes to break down fructans and GOS (galacto-oligosaccharides).

“What are FODMAPs?”

The low-FODMAP diet has been instrumental in helping relieve common symptoms of IBS and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.  FODMAPs stand for Fermentable, Oligo-saccarides, Di-saccharides, Mono-saccharides And Polyols. These fructans, galacto-oligosaccharides, lactose, excess fructose and polyols are found in natural and processed foods.

When FODMAPs are malabsorbed they can cause more water to be delivered through the bowel which can contribute to diarrhea in some people.  Sugars from FODMAPs make their way to the large intestine and are then fermented by bacteria, producing gases.  Gas can be produced in the small or large intestine, and which we all know so well, then comes symptoms of bloating, distention, abdominal pain and even back pain.  For some, this gas production can slow movement through the bowel and mean constipation.  Sometimes it can take days or weeks for these symptoms to ease up.  It wasn’t until I found the low-FODMAP diet that I began to notice a difference in how my body began to digest the right foods.  Keep in mind, everyone’s body chemistry, environment and stress level is different, so following the low-FODMAP diet is very individualized.

HONEY FODMAP LIFE“Which Foods Should I Avoid?”

Along with wheat, barley, rye, garlic and onions, honey, lactose, sugar alcohols, certain veggies, fruits and certain legumes are avoided.  The low-FODMAP diet is not a gluten-free diet, however you will see us mention gluten-free foods as most are wheat-free.  Not all gluten-free foods are free of FODMAPs so you’ll need to read all the labels of products (example: Udi’s White Sandwich Bread is low-FODMAP but Rudi’s Original sandwich bread has high FODMAPs like inulin and honey).

Take a look at this page to learn more about the foods to avoid and this page to see our grocery list of all the foods you can safely enjoy on the diet.  And finally visit this page to learn How to Start the Low-FODMAP Diet.

If you have already taken hydrogen breath tests and know you can either completely absorb fructose or lactose, you do not have to completely negate either from the diet, but can as an extra precaution during the first and second phase.

There’s a lot to learn, so you’ll want to follow us on social media as we share new content, tips, advice and recipes often.  Plus you’ll meet people who feel your pain and know what it’s like to have painful, uncomfortable and sometimes embarrassing symptoms.  We are here for you!  Comment below with any questions.

SIGN UP for our Newsletter!

facebook iconinstagram30x30 youtubetwitter-icon-30x30

Welcome to FODMAP Life! ~ Colleen

 

What’s the Best Diet for IBS?

Me in 2013
That’s me a few years ago!

I’ve been there…not wanting to leave the house, horrified at the thought of being in public, not wanting to even think about which clothes would fit for the night.  For a while I bought long shirts and sweaters or dresses without waistlines, anything to take the pressure off and hide my bloated belly.

It was in 2010, when my IBS symptoms were sudden and came out of the blue.  I went from competing in triathlons and road races to feeling so uncomfortable, that even walking was painful.  I became less and less active and my IBS didn’t really improve until I found the low-FODMAP diet in 2013.  Once I tried out this elimination diet, and then began to reintroduce foods, everything started to get easier and make more sense.

Food sensitivities/allergies and bacterial overgrowth, inflammation, lack of digestive enzymes, parasites –  these and many others can all lead to IBS.  Since there are so many factors that can contribute to IBS and various others factors that can make symptoms worse (diet, stress, pollution, environment) no one can truly pin one definitive cause or solution for IBS.  However, the good news, is that the low-FODMAP diet has worked for many people so far and it’s also a safer way to treat symptoms versus getting prescriptions for drugs.  Drugs come with side affects and they don’t all necessarily “cure” us.  Using “food as medicine” is something I feel very strongly about.

Young Woman Looking Out From Cutting Board And Looking On VegetaSo What’s the Best Diet for IBS?  The low-FODMAP diet doesn’t work for everyone but it does provide “good relief of symptoms in about 75% of patients” according to research in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology by Peter R Gibson and Susan J Shepherd titled Evidence-based dietary management of functional gastrointestinal symptoms: The FODMAP approach.  

Of all the recommendations I have seen about the best foods for IBS, the low-FODMAP diet seems to be the most calculated and scientifically-backed approach.  Many people visit my Facebook page and have discussions with each other are surprised as to why some can handle certain FODMAPs and others cannot.  I always tell our reactions or non-reactions are due to our distinct digestive systems, our environments and individual life situations.  Everyone is different!

Don’t get discouraged if you can’t handle one food or a group of specific foods – there are plenty of very healthy options out there, and life will be better once you know your gut!  Do your research, get several opinions and be aware of what you’re eating, how you’re eating and living.  Meditate on a daily basis, drink more water, follow the grocery list and think positively about all the good foods (and less sugar) you’re putting into your body!

Don’t forget to…

Subscribe to the FODMAP Life Newsletter

Check us out on Facebook and Instagram

And Subscribe to our Youtube pagehttp://ow.ly/zydyP