Rice Milk Gets the Low-FODMAP Green Light from Monash!

rice milk low fodmapThere’s been a lot of back and forth about rice milk and whether or not it’s low or high in FODMAPs. Monash University had warned us in August of 2015 and in earlier reports that rice milk had an overall rating of HIGH when consumed at a 1/4 or 1/2 cup. I am happy to share with you that rice milk has definitely received the green light to be low in FODMAPs.

Stick to a low-FODMAP serving of 200ml, otherwise high quantities could mean high amounts of the FODMAP fructans (the “O” in FODMAP, Oligosaccharides)

doctor jane muir monash universityDr. Jane Muir, Head of Translational Nutrition Science in the Department of Gastroenterology, Central Clinical School, Monash University and her team have conducted some further testing and analyzing and reported on Sunday that rice milk is LOW in FODMAPs. That’s great news for vegans, vegetarians and anyone that enjoys non-dairy milk.

Here’s a snippet from their blog post: “We have now reviewed the rating for rice milk and will be modifying this accordingly. We have given a safe (low level green rating) for 200 ml of rice milk per sitting. The results for the Australian, UK and US will be in the app very soon. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused – but this is science in action! and part of the ongoing research and refinement of the Monash University Low FODMAP diet. Be careful: There are still some fructans present in some rice milks and therefore we do not recommend very high quantities of rice milk in one sitting.” You can take a look at the full post here.

And since we are on the topic, here are other non-dairy milk options for you that are low in FODMAPs, with low-FODMAP servings:

  • Almond milk (1 cup)
  • Coconut milk, canned (1/2 cup)
  • Coconut (UHT-ultra high temperature) (1/2 cup) (150 ml, moderate in FODMAPs)
  • Oat milk (1/8 cup)
  • Hemp milk (1 cup)
  • Soy milk (soy protein 1 cup)
  • Soya milk unsweetened (hulled soya beans) (1/4 cup) (1/2 cup moderate in FODMAPs)*contains moderate amounts of Oligos-GOS. Limit intake

Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Looking for help on the low-FODMAP diet?  Ask me about my nutritional coaching services by contacting me here.

Be good to yourself and your gut!BEC_6825

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme
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New Recipe: Low-FODMAP Blueberry Lavender Pancakes

I love lavender.  I love the color and the sweet floral fragrance…I love the sight of lavender fields, the smell of lavender essential oils and I also love lavender in foods.

Lavender gives baked goods and pancakes a lovely taste, and also goes well with lemon flavors.  I was looking for a reason to experiment with pancakes recently, and am very pleased with the recipe below, and I think you will just love these pancakes and the hint of lavender along with the delicate blueberries.

You can learn about the history of lavender here.  I also love the recipe here for Lemon and Lavender Chicken -just be sure to swap out the high-FODMAP honey for low-FODMAP maple syrup.

I adapted the recipe below from Bob’s Red Mill Fluffy Gluten Free Pancakes recipe.  When I worked with Bob’s Red Mill recipe, at first it seemed a little too dry so I added more milk and also swapped olive oil for coconut oil.  The other additions I made to their basic recipe was to add in fresh blueberries and No. 3 Lavender Infused Simple Syrup from Sonoma and Co.

I had fun styling this photograph and dripping the delicious maple syrup on top…can you just taste the pancakes now?  My Mother’s gorgeous Belleek China Shamrock Teapot can be seen in the background, along with flowers from my garden and a white vase from the table settings we used for my wedding.
low fodmap blueberry lavender pancakes

Low-FODMAP Blueberry Lavender Pancakes

*TIP – When buying flours make sure you read labels to ensure no high-FODMAPs are in the ingredient list.  I like using Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free 1 to 1 Baking Flour for many of my recipes.

Directions

  1. Preheat a griddle or frying pan to medium or medium-high heat (350 – 375°F).
  2. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.
  3. Place coconut oil in a microwave-safe bowl and melt on high for 30-45 seconds (microwave times vary).
  4. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, melted coconut oil and simple syrup.
  5. Using a wire whisk, combine wet ingredients into dry ingredients and whisk until smooth.  Gently fold in blueberries.
  6. Ladle approximately ⅓ cup pancake batter onto hot griddle or pan. Once bubbly and edges begin to thicken and are dry, flip to opposite side.  Cook on each side for about 3 – 4 minutes per side.
  7. Garnish with a pinch of confectioner’s sugar and edible lavender if desired!

Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Looking for help on the low-FODMAP diet?  Ask me about my nutritional coaching services by contacting me here.

Be good to yourself and your gut!BEC_6825

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme

Low-FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pretzel Truffles

low fodmap chocolate peanut butter truffles4It’s been raining in California lately and I love it.  Looking out the window I can’t help but remember rainy lazy days in New York, the rain spattering off the deck and weighing down the leaves in our big back yard on Long Island.  Rain barely falls here in California, and when it does it symbolizes a sort of calm to me – maybe it’s just nostalgia or the sound and smell of rain is just calming in of itself.  Rainy days like these are also a great time to to make desserts if I may say so myself.  What’s your favorite dish to cook on a rainy day?

Today I had a lot of fun making these Low-FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pretzels. They are made with just three ingredients – natural peanut butter, dark chocolate and gluten-free pretzels – that’s it!  They don’t take long to make, but better, they are lower in sugar than many other holiday desserts.  They are both salty and sweet and are made with dark chocolate, which is low in FODMAPs and dairy free.  Low-FODMAP diet or not, dark chocolate is always a better choice.  Remember to stick to dark chocolate that is low in fiber, does not contain milk or milk products (most dark chocolate do not by default), inulin, dried fruits or other high-FODMAPs like HFCS (high fructose corn syrup), agave or honey.

Here are some more recent holiday recipes I’ve shared:

Empty cookbook for Christmas recipes on wooden tableIngredients

  • 1/2 cup natural peanut butter (crunchy is best)
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free pretzels
  • 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips

 

Directions

  1. Lay a piece of parchment paper across a cookie sheet or large, flat plate.
  2. Place pretzels in a bowl and crush with a meat tenderizer, other heavy kitchen utensil or crush gently in between palms.
  3. Combine peanut butter and pretzels in bowl.  Remove about a teaspoon at a time of peanut butter pretzel mixture and form into little balls.  Place on cookie sheet or plate in freezer and cool for 30 minutes.
  4. Just before removing peanut butter balls from freezer, melt chocolate chips in a glass measuring cup for 45 seconds to 1:30.  Be careful to not overheat.  Chocolate is ready when you can smoothly stir it with a spoon.
  5. Use a tablespoon and dip into melted chocolate.  Roll peanut butter pretzel balls on spoon to coat and place on cookie sheet.  Once done with all balls, drip any extra chocolate over balls and swirl around tops with spoon.  Chill for at least 30 minutes then serve.

low fodmap chocolate peanut butter truffles3

 

 

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Enjoy the holidays!

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme

colleen frnacioli

IBS, Our Emotional Well-Being and Our Second Brain

Although our gastrointestinal tracts can affect our mood or happiness, our everyday emotional well-being may rely on messages from our second brain in the gut to our brain above.

low fodmap diet stressIf you experience psychological issues like stress, depression or anxiety, all can affect the movement and contractions in your GI tract. The result? Inflammation, infection and the inability to digest certain foods.  Did you know that the reason you may be moody might be due to what your gut is telling your brain?

There is a strong link between the brain and the gut. Many in the field of health and science believe the nerves in our gut, which are actually controlled by our second brain (located within the gut), influence negative emotions, stress or anxiety. The gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to emotion. Whether we are angry or sad, relaxed or anxious, all can trigger symptoms in the gut! The brain can influence our perception of what is happening in the gut as well as the activity or “tuning” of the Enteric Nervous System (ENS) “gut brain.”

Issues in your gut can affect your energy level, weight, mood, or may lead to premature aging, chronic disease or allergies. When you have IBS, a healthy diet is imperative, but so is taking care of the mind and body.

By taking care of the mind you may help relax your body and your gut.  Why would you need to try and relax the gut?  Because it’s possibly your gut that’s triggering changes in your mood.

“For decades, researchers and doctors thought that anxiety and depression contributed to these problems (symptoms of IBS). But our studies and others show that it may also be the other way around,” explains Jay Pasricha, M.D., director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Neurogastroenterology.  Researchers now have evidence that when your gastrointestinal system experiences irritation, it may be sending signals to the central nervous system (CNS), triggering changes in your mood.

“These new findings may explain why a higher-than-normal percentage of people with IBS and functional bowel problems develop depression and anxiety,” Pasricha says. “That’s important, because up to 30 to 40 percent of the population has functional bowel problems at some point.”

“A person’s stomach or intestinal distress can be the cause or the product of anxiety, stress, or depression. That’s because the brain and the gastrointestinal (GI) system are intimately connected — so intimately that they should be viewed as one system.” Harvard Health Publications.

Everyone’s brain-gut interaction is different and several factors can contribute like: state of mind (stressed, relaxed), surrounding environment (pollutants, temperature), distractions (people, technology), past experiences (good and bad) and the gut’s sensitivity to stimuli. The ENS is the master controller, mixing and moving contents around the gut, via a system of complex nerves in the walls of the gut. The ENS can sense what’s happening in the gut and it then controls motility; it is connected to the brain and can be influenced by signals but it can also work solo with its own networks of neurons (nerves).

What Can You Do?

  • Seek out mind-body therapies like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medical hypnotherapy
  • Talk therapy
  • Meditate
  • Gentle exercise like yoga, Pilates, qigong, tai chi, stretching, swimming, golfing, light aerobics, or an easy bike ride.

What Else?

  • Eat slowly
  • Eat without distraction
  • Cook for yourself
  • Get creative

and finally

Be good to yourself –it’s one of the best gifts you can give. If negative talk is part of your everyday life, you need to start saying nicer things –to yourself. Become your own health advocate and learn as much about the low-FODMAP diet as you can. Use your Food & Symptom Diary everyday. Become more connected to healthy foods and cooking for yourself. Everyday send positive energy to your gut. Remind yourself why you are awesome. Life is full of ups and downs. There will always be hard times – have a plan in place for when disaster strikes so you can keep your gut, body and mind as healthy and calm as possible. Eat well, meditate, exercise and be grateful for all the positives in your life, and all the negatives that made you stronger.

Learn more about the Brain-Gut connection by downloading a free infographic here

Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Have a great rest of your day!

Colleen Francioli

colleen frnacioliCertified Nutritionist Consultant

 

 

 

Sources:

The Brain-Gut Connection, Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Complete Low-FODMAP Diet: A Revolutionary Plan for Managing IBS and Other Digestive Disorders

Think Twice: How the Gut’s “Second Brain” Influences Mood and Well-Being The emerging and surprising view of how the enteric nervous system in our bellies goes far beyond just processing the food we eat. By Adam Hadhazy | February 12, 2010.

Irritable bowel syndrome: A microbiome-gut-brain axis disorder? Paul J Kennedy, John F Cryan, Timothy G Dinan, and Gerard Clarke World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Oct 21; 20(39): 14105–14125. Published online 2014 Oct 21. doi:  10.3748/wjg.v20.i39.14105

 

Abundantly Happy Kale, Grains and Seeds Salad – New low-FODMAP Recipe!

Abundantly Happy Kale, Grains and Seeds Salad

I’ve been enjoying my time as a co-host for the #21dayfodmapchallenge, created by Julie of CalmBellyKitchen.com and also co-hosted by Anna of FODMAP Journey, who has guest blogged for FODMAPLife several times (check out this awesome post of Anna’s).

If you haven’t joined in yet there’s still time!  Learn more by visiting my Instagram profile here.

Yesterday’s theme for the#21dayfodmapchallenge was Great Grains so I decided to finish a recipe I’ve been working on, and I hope you enjoy it!

This salad is a low-FODMAP phytonutrient and vitamin powerhouse and it’s also colorful, crunchy and easy to make.  Vegetarians and vegans will love the mix of veggies, seeds, grains and nuts.  If you’re a meat-eater (and you just need to have your meat) you can always add a piece of grilled fish or lean meat to this salad, however I think it’s perfectly filling as is.  Make ahead of time and have for lunch the next day or bring to a gathering.

low fodmap grain salad
photo by: Colleen Francioli

Ingredients 

Serves 4

  • 9 leaves curly kale
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • juice of one lemon
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder (purchase one without FODMAPs)
  • 1/2 tablespoon ginger, freshly grated
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, diced
  • 1 medium carrot, cut into matchsticks, then into thirds
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds
  • 2 radishes, sliced very thin
  • 1 cup brown rice, cooked
  • 1 cup quinoa, cooked
  • 1 cup buckwheat, cooked
  • 1 tablespoon slivered almonds

Directions

  1. Cut away ribs and stems from kale, wash thoroughly, drain in colander.  Chop kale leaves into long, thin shreds.  Add to a large-sized bowl and sprinkle salt and 2 tablespoons oil on top.  Massage leaves with hands until leaves begin to darken and soften.
  2. Add remaining oil to bowl, squeeze in lemon juice, discarding any pits. Add in turmeric, curry powder, ginger, celery, yellow bell pepper, carrot, pumpkin seeds, radishes, brown rice, quinoa and buckwheat.  Toss to combine.  Add more lemon juice or olive oil if desired.  Divide onto plates and top with slivered almonds.  Keep covered in refrigerator for up to three days.

*Tip – If brown rice, quinoa and buckwheat have been made ahead of time (a smart idea!) and are cold, I like to combine all into a skillet with 1 tablespoon unrefined coconut oil to warm up before adding to the other salad ingredients.  Preparing such low-FODMAP staples such as these ahead of time makes it much easier to follow the low-FODMAP diet. During your busy week, add them to salads, soups, stir-fry, sandwiches and more.

Hope you enjoy!  Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Have a great rest of your day/evening, where ever in the world you are!

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant

 

TRAVELING on the Low FODMAP diet: Tips to keep the belly happy (and a simple recipe)

Hi friends!! I am beyond STOKED to contribute to this blog 🙂 and I want to thank Colleen for welcoming me! I hope to be able to inspire others on this FODMAP journey, maybe making life a little easier!!!

Since MEMORIAL DAY is around the corner, which means Summer weekend getaways (woooohoooo)I thought what a better time than now to talk about traveling tips on the low FODMAP diet.  Lets face it, traveling can be super stressful when you are on a restrictive diet (and cause anxiety which is a BIGGGGG NO NO for us tummy issue folk). Here are few tips that work for me and keep me sane on my travels, since I refuse to let my dietary restrictions control MY LIFE ( I shall control them 😉 :

ITEMS TO PACK:

MY TRAVEL NECESSITIES
MY TRAVEL NECESSITIES
  • PEPPERMINT TEA BAGS: Perfect for taming an upset traveling tummy.
  • RICE CAKES: Lundberg brown rice are my fave.
  • JUSTINS ALMOND BUTTER PACKETS OR A JAR OF PEANUTBUTTER : I prefer PB since almond butter has a limit, 1 tbsp= about 12 almonds which is OVER the low FODMAP limit of 10 almonds. Nut butters are great to spread on your ricecakes with Banana coins for breakfast, snacks or whatev. Bananas are easy to find anywhere. Perfect airplane or train snack!
The perfect tummy friendly snack
The perfect tummy friendly snack
  • CINNAMON: for your bananas/ricecakes
  • OATMEAL: I bring gluten free Bobs Red Mill quick cooking oats in ziplock bags. Add boiling water in a paper cup, add chia seeds, bananas,peanutbutter, cinnamon: fiberfulBFAST!

    photo 3-2
    YUM!
  • CHIA SEEDS: Fiber when traveling!
  • ZIPLOCK BAGS/PLASTIC KNIVES/MEASURING CUPS: I pack these because you can easily carry your snacks around, use the knives to cut bananas, and measuring cups for your oats/chia seeds/nut butters.
  • PRE SOAKED NUTS : raw almonds,hazelnuts, walnuts (all limit 10), pumpkin seeds(2 tbsp), when soaked are easier for digestion.
  • DIY TRAILMIXES:  Throw in gluten free pretzels, nuts, any low fodmap cereal, ‘enjoy life’ choco chips.. etc, get creative here and know your limits..
  • HOMEMADE COOKIES: this is one of my FAV traveling items because they can keep well for a week in a mini fridge and it can work as a breakfast/snack/dessert when everyone else is indulging in ice-cream or whatever those non FODMAP people eat ;), take out a yummy cookie!

RECIPE: EASY Oatmeal Banana cookie

The easiest oatmeal cookie
The easiest oatmeal cookie
  • 1 cup old fashioned oats
  • 2 medium bananas
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda

Optional add-ins: 10 or so chopped almonds,hazelnuts or pecans ,1/4c unsweetened shredded coconut, 2 tbsp raw pumpkin seeds, 1/4 c enjoy life chocolate chips..

Instructions: Mix ingredients together. Flatten about a tablespoon fof the mix on baking sheet sprayed with coconut oil. Bake at 350 c for 10-12 minutes until the bottoms are golden.  Makes about 10-15 cookies.

HAPPY TRAVELING AND WISHING DIGESTIVE PEACE AND LOVE FOR ALL!!

XO

SHOSHANA

P.S.: AWESOME TIP FOR DINING OUT: I always tell my server that I have ALLERGIES rather than intolerances. I always find this makes them take it more serious!

SURF
ANDDDDDD GONE SURFING 😉 ALOHA!

 

NEW FODMAP Life T-Shirt On Sale -Proceeds to Benefit Research

We are so excited to launch our first product for FODMAP Life!

FODMAP Life T-Shirt "I'm Not Pregnant..."
FODMAP Life T-Shirt “I’m Not Pregnant…”

A portion of the proceeds will benefit research on new foods for the low-FODMAP diet!  What does that mean for you and me?  That more foods will be analyzed for their FODMAP content, which is excellent considering the low-FODMAP foods list can feel limiting at times!

BUY YOUR SHIRT HERE

Our first t-shirt was designed by Katie Foerster.  She’s not only an amazing artist but she’s also my dear friend from college.  On top of designing our first shirt, she has designed our beautiful logo, all of our social media channel art, as well as a few other surprises (coming soon).

katie foersterKatie has worked with the Four Seasons Resorts and Hotels, the Boston Bruins, the Vermont Teddy Bear Company and many others.  Katie is a Rhode Island School of Design certificate student in Graphic Design, a professional in Project Management, a successful Set & Product Stylist and efficient Photo Producer.  Katie understands all that is creative and has proven her talents in her work. She currently resides on Cape Cod, Massachusetts where she grew up.  Check out her work here: http://www.designkf.com/category/designs/

Stay Connected! 

Here’s to your health!

Colleen Francioli, Certified Nutritionist & Founder