11 Products to Try When You Have IBS

Ughhh…being bloated, distended or constipated (pardon my French) sucks!  You may be sitting somewhere right now (at work, in your car, about to get on a plane, at dinner, at an event), feeling like you can’t get out of the way from your bloated self (and you wore your slightly tight jeans/pants today with a button that’s pressing into your abdomen *facepalm*)!

Aches and pains concept. Woman having bad ache and pain. Female placing hands on stomach.

The distention and pain is annoying and fills you with anxiety.  It’s hard to put on a happy face when you feel so sick and sluggish.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) can be visible (bloating, distention) or invisible (abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, depression, hopelessness).   I wish there was more awareness around IBS so people like you and me could just have friends, family and co-workers that understand. Maybe someday we can all help to grow awareness to a point where IBS is more understood and accepted as something REAL and not interpreted as something in our heads….for now, let’s focus on you.

While the low-FODMAP diet is a great dietary approach to help relieve symptoms of IBS, sometimes we need a little more than diet to help.

When you’re having stressful IBS moments, there might be other things you can do. I’ve listed some recommendations below for products you can try.

Please note that everything I’ve listed below is purely for educational purposes and it is best to discuss most of them (like supplements) with your physician.

*Remember, at the present time there is no cure for IBS, and no magical pill to take care of your symptoms, but there is hope through alternative means.

*Typically when someone is following the low-FODMAP diet, a FODMAP-trained nutritionist will suggest not taking any supplements so as to receive a more accurate indication of possible triggers of IBS.  If before or after you have tried the low-FODMAP diet and want to try the products below, all supplements listed appear to be low in FODMAPs due to the ingredients used (no lactose, wheat, or FODMAPs such as fructooligosaccharides).

Psyllium Husk: 

Several products are available to help with constipation and diarrhea but many are made with FODMAPs or ingredients you may not necessarily need.  When in doubt, use products that have the least amount of ingredients and go natural!  I personally use psyllium husk to help with constipation and it can also be used to help with diarrhea.  It can also help with hemorrhoids and IBD.  Dr. Kevin Curran, founder of EthnoHerbalist goes into more detail about the benefits of psyllium husk.  Please read his article here.  Dr. Curran holds a PhD in molecular biology and currently serves as a professor at the University of San Diego, teaching courses on Cell Biology and Ethnobotany.

  • Organic India Whole Husk Psyllium, 12-Ounce – I like this brand and I add it to smoothies, lactose-free yogurt, gluten-free and low-FODMAP cereal.
    • Learn more from the University of Maryland Medical Center about other uses, precautions and possible interactions.

Peppermint Enteric-Coated Capsules:

Another natural option to help with symptoms of IBS, I have found peppermint enteric-coated capsules to be helpful when I feel bloated like a Macy’s Day Parade balloon!  On their own, peppermint enteric-coated capsules don’t completely relieve me, but they do help.  They may work for you – just remember, we are all different and every gut is different in the way it responds or reacts to supplements, food, stress, the environment and therapy.

Peppermint has been shown to be a calcium channel blocker of muscle.  What that means is peppermint has the ability to block calcium shifts within muscle cells, enabling muscles to relax.

As reported in the New York Times Well Blog: “In a report financed by the American College of Gastroenterology and published in the journal BMJ in 2008, scientists conducted an analysis of previous studies comparing peppermint oil with placebo in about 400 patients. Ultimately, they found that only 26 percent of patients treated with peppermint oil — typically administered twice daily in capsule form, for a period of one to three months — continued to show symptoms of I.B.S. after treatment, compared with 65 percent of those who were given placebo. The scientists concluded that the evidence was compelling enough that more studies should be conducted, and that in the interim, ‘current national guidelines for the management of the condition should be updated to include these data.'”

Tea:

Any organic Peppermint tea may help to ease your gut but another tea I really like is Smooth Move Tea by Traditional Medicinals.  This tea  has not been tested for FODMAPs, however, it may help when you have constipation.  When needed, I drink this tea before bedtime and then drink a glass of tepid water in the morning and usually find relief not too long after – which means that if you have this tea make sure you’re not planning on running out of the house early the next morning or partaking in vigorous exercise – you WILL need a bathroom close by :).  I also like to take this tea with me when I travel because traveling often sets off constipation.  You can see the ingredients here.

Digestive Enzymes:

When taken right before a meal, digestive enzymes may help to break down difficult-to-digest proteins, starches and fats into compounds that make nutrients easier to digest, and they can also decrease the number of colonized microorganisms in the stomach.  Digestive enzymes help the stomach, pancreas, liver, gallbladder and small intestine to not have to work as hard. Digestive enzyme production declines with age so people 35 years and older may benefit more from taking them. Your doctor may also suggest hydrochloric acid supplements.  Other health issues that may respond well to digestive enzymes are: Crohn’s disease, liver disease, hypochlorhydria, deficiencies in iron, vitamins B12, D and A.

Pancreatic Enzymes:

Pancreatic enzymes may bring on some mild relief when taken with meals.  They can help digest and break down foods, keeping food particles from wandering too far and deep into the gastrointestinal tract and so the bacteria is essentially starved.  Speak with your physician before use.

Water Bottle:

That’s right.  A water bottle.  Something very simple yet so effective!  I bet most people reading this post do not drink enough water.  I carry a large water bottle around with me all day to stay hydrated.  When empty, I fill it right back up and continue drinking. Sometimes I add ice and lemon juice.

Chicken Broth:

When my gut is all bent out of shape I reach for chicken broth.  It’s warm and soothing, easily digestible, low in calories and fat and rich in a few minerals.  I either make my own chicken broth at home (there’s a recipe in my book The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook) or I use this brand which is low in FODMAPs based on the ingredients used:

Pedometers:

If constipation strikes do you ask yourself: “Have I moved enough today?”  Often times we become constipated because we haven’t exercised or moved enough.  A simple 15-30 minute walk might do wonders for you.  In order to track my activity for the day and to encourage more steps and movement, I use the FitBit Zip Wireless pedometer.  I also make sure I’m drinking enough water and eating low-FODMAP sources of fiber.

Heating Pads:

Ahhh I love heating pads!  If you try a heating pad, it can act as a muscle relaxant to relieve any painful spasms and cramping you feel in your abdomen.

When sitting back with a heating pad, if you have the opportunity, close your eyes and use that time to meditate.  Your mind and the rest of your body may also relax, leaving you feeling much better than anticipated.  If meditating solo is not your thing (or you have difficulty silencing your mind as many of us do), connect headphones to your phone and use a self-guided meditation app or check out some free meditations online.  

Perhaps one of the best things you can do when you have IBS is to meditate
Perhaps one of the best things you can do when you have IBS is to meditate

Self-Guided Meditation Apps and Online Meditation:

 

Low-FODMAP Cookbook:E Low FODMAP Diet CB.indd

Looking for ways to eat with peace of mind and cook or bake delicious foods using low-FODMAP ingredients? My book  The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook features over 300 low-FODMAP and gluten-Free recipes, plus diet tips, menu plans and more!  Buy here on Amazon.  Learn more about the book here.

 

Sources:
Pimentel M.D., Mark (2008-01-01). A New IBS Solution: Bacteria-The Missing Link in Treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome (p. 97). Health Point Press. Kindle Edition.

Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Looking for help on the low-FODMAP diet?  Ask me about my nutritional coaching services by contacting me here.

Be good to yourself and your gut!BEC_6825

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme

 

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5 Ways to Lower Your SALT Intake While Eating a Low-FODMAP Diet

LOWER SALT LOW FODMAP

Those following a Low-FODMAP diet may cringe at having to restrict their diet even further, however eating less sodium is very important for good health.

About 90% of Americans consume too much sodium according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), increasing their risk of high blood pressure. Americans consume about 3,400 mg of sodium each day, and the majority of sodium eaten is already present in foods before purchase or preparation.

Over 3 / 4 of our sodium intake is from processed foods. It turns out that very little of our sodium intake comes from the salt shaker – only about 6%. Since most of our salt intake comes from processed and packaged foods, below are some key methods for how to reduce this major source of sodium (often the hidden sodium) in our diets:

  1. Eat fewer processed and prepared foods and more whole foods.  Bread/Crackers are one of the main sources for sodium in a typical American diet. You want to carefully check the sodium counts per serving on all nutrition labels, especially Gluten-Free foods.
  2. Eat less or moderate amounts of cheese. Cheese tastes good, however lactose is a FODMAP and can cause problems when too much is consumed (even of an allowed cheese).
  3. Check sodium amounts and add them up. You may think that you are not eating a lot of sodium, however when you total up the amount per meal and per day you may be surprised at how much you are eating!
  4. Look for Low-Salt versions of Low-FODMAP foods. *Look for low-sodium versions of deli meat such as Low-Sodium Turkey Breast because deli meat often has a lot of sodium.  Buy chicken stock with “No Added Salt” while also free of onion/garlic (to be free of FODMAPs) because canned/boxed soups have a lot of sodium (Swanson’s makes one in the USA ). Look for “No Added Salt” Tuna Fish  because canned fish often is high is sodium (Trader Joe’s makes a good one).
  5. Use salt-free, low-FODMAP herbs/spices (fresh are best) liberally to add flavor. Start an herb garden inside or outside for a continuing supply of herbs/spices such as green onion tops, rosemary, basil, thyme, dill, oregano, spearmint/peppermint, sage, etc. Adding flavor without salt is easy if one takes the time to find and use low-salt or salt-free low-FODMAP herbs/spices. Using infused oils such as garlic-, shallot-, or truffle-infused oil are great ways to add flavor without salt and you only need a small amount to add flavor without FODMAPs (fructans are not soluble in oil and should not cause FODMAP-related issues).

 

A low-sodium recipe from my website (SalTrax.com) and adapted for Low-FODMAP:

Flavorful Low-Sodium and Low-FODMAP Chicken Soup
Servings: 8

Ingredients:

  • 1 whole chicken or cut up parts
  • 8 c. cold water
  • 1 c. celery, large slices
  • 1 c. carrots, whole
  • 1 tsp. garlic-infused oil
  • 1 tsp. shallot-infused oil
  • Parsley, bunch (and/or other fresh herbs of your choice)
  • 1/4 tsp pepper or 3-4 peppercorns and 2  tsp. table salt – divided

Directions:

  1. Place chicken or chicken parts in a large dutch oven.
  2. Add cold water and rest of the ingredients except for salt; bring to a boil.
  3. Simmer for 2 hours.
  4. Add 1 tsp salt halfway through cooking and 1 tsp at end of cooking.
  5. Remove chicken and vegetables from broth and refrigerate broth overnight.
  6. Remove hardened fat from surface on next day and remove bones and skin from chicken and discard. Remove and discard any overcooked mushy vegetables.
  7. Refrigerate meat and vegetables.
  8. Next day, add chicken and vegetables to the broth after fat is skimmed off.

*Optional: add fresh quartered potatoes or cooked rice (uncooked rice absorbs too much of the chicken broth); sliced celery, sliced carrots, and parsley to the soup. 
Boil and simmer until vegetables are tender (30 -45 min). Serve warm

 

Resources for more information about eating a low-sodium diet:

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)

American Heart Association

National Salt Reduction Initiative (NSRI)

My book: How to keep track of your salt intake: Easy as 1 – 2 – 3

Sandra Parkington

A bit about me:   After years of digestive troubles, I became very ill five years ago and was finally diagnosed with Fructose Malabsorption by an astute allergist. In the past five years it has been quite the journey of learning what foods my body can tolerate and which ones throw me into horrible symptoms. I seem to be holding my own now following the Low Fodmap diet; I eat gluten-free, low-sodium, and dairy-free in addition to pretty strictly following the diet. Since going dairy-free a year ago, my frequent migraine headaches are gone. Before I knew dairy was the culprit I wrongly thought that I couldn’t tolerate tomatoes or carrots. I now am able to eat a small amount of tomatoes and carrots which is wonderful. I especially enjoy eating them when they are fresh from the Farmer’s Market.

Colleen and I had met online several years ago through one of the Facebook Low-Fodmap support groups, however due to various scheduling conflicts we had not had the chance to meet. Finally meeting Colleen in person recently at the annual San Diego Gluten Free / Allergy Free Expo was a real treat. 

Low-FODMAP Overnight Banana Chocolate Oats

It’s the weekend!  What does that mean?  Relaxing by the pool, seeing friends, going to a BBQ or will you be running errands, going to events, cleaning the house?  Whatever you have on schedule, the weekends are a great time to do some meal planning for the low-FODMAP diet, and overnight oats are an easy meal to make.  They are great to bring to work on Monday – whatever work means for you.  You might have a 9-5, maybe you’re retired and busy volunteering or running after little ones.  Whatever the case, make the low-FODMAP diet work for you and plan ahead.  It saves time and unnecessary anxiety and hangriness!

Try out this delicious recipe next time you need an easy to make breakfast that will power you through your afternoon or workout!

Low-FODMAP Overnight Banana Chocolate Oats from The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook. Photo Kelly Jaggers. Publisher: F+W Media.
Low-FODMAP Overnight Banana Chocolate Oats from The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook. Photo Kelly Jaggers. Publisher: F+W Media.

 

The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook is available now from these booksellers:

Publisher: F+W Media. Publish Date: May 6, 2016

Overnight Banana Chocolate Oats recipe below and on page 59 in The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook

Per serving: Calories 342 | Fat: 11g | Protein: 7g | Sodium: 44mg | Fiber: 7g | Carbohydrates: 60g | Sugar: 34g

Serves 1

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup gluten-free rolled oats
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 ripe medium banana, mashed
  • 2 tablespoons lactose-free vanilla yogurt
  • 1/8 teaspoon alcohol-free vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons maple syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 ounce dark chocolate, smashed into chunks
  • 1-2 banana slices, for garnish

Directions:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine oats and almond milk and stir.  Add cocoa powder, banana, yogurt, vanilla, maple syrup, and cinnamon; stir to combine.  Place in a canning jar and cover with lid.  Refrigerate overnight.
  2. The next day, top with chocolate chunks and banana slices and enjoy!  Can be stored in refrigerator up to 3 days.

ENJOY!

Spread the News! Low-FODMAP Book Signing in N. County San Diego

Dear Readers!  If you or someone you know has IBS and lives in San Diego or Southern California, please share the blog post about my upcoming book signing.  Thank you in advance!
PRESS RELEASE
Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook Signing in San Diego for Those with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
A new cookbook by Colleen Francioli includes over 300 gluten-free and low-FODMAP recipes, for symptom-free living from IBS
(Encinitas, CA) June 1, 2016 – Nutritionist and author Colleen Francioli will be signing copies of her book, The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook at the 2GOOD2B Bakery In Encinitas on June 5th, 2016 from 2pm to 3:30pm.  Her book is perfect for those looking to find relief from uncomfortable, painful or embarrassing symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO).
A Certified Nutritionist and founder of www.FODMAPLIfe.com, Colleen provides over 300 low-FODMAP and gluten-free recipes plus the basics of the low-FODMAP diet, an elimination diet.  The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook is available for order now and published in May 2016 by F+W Media, one of the largest special interest publishers in the world.
Admission to the book signing is free but RSVPs are requested as refreshments will be provided.  Please RSVP here:https://goo.gl/jY0ykX
What exactly is the low-FODMAP diet and what are FODMAPs? Scientists have discovered that FODMAPs, a collection of short-chain carbohydrates (sugars and fibers) that are difficult to digest, are often the source of digestive issues and are now known to trigger symptoms of IBS and SIBO.  FODMAPs are found in many common foods like wheat (pasta, pizza, bread), milk, beans, apples, mushrooms, honey, agave, inulin and other vegetables, fruits, and sweeteners.
Following an elimination diet such as the low-FODMAP diet can be difficult, however the author drew on her own personal experience with IBS and what she learned from her fans of FODMAP Life to provide crowd-pleasing recipes and several tips for diet success.  “I once suffered from IBS with symptoms sometimes lasting for days, weeks or even months.  It affected so many aspects of my life until I found the low-FODMAP diet and began teaching others what I had learned” says Francioli.  “The low-FODMAP diet can be confusing but with my book, sufferers of IBS will quickly become acquainted with low-FODMAP foods and ingredients thus boosting their confidence and creativity to make satisfying meals, even if they lead a busy life.”
Book SigningMore than a cookbook, The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook includes a chapter dedicated to the basics of the diet, as well as advice and tips like how to read labels to find low- or high-FODMAPs, how to eat out on the diet, how to plan meals, and how to work in stress relief for a calm body and mind. Menu plans, low- and high-FODMAP food lists and diet resources can also be found in the appendices.  The recipes featured are flavorful and fun; some have been inspired by different cultures; most are very easy to make; and some are popular favorites re-created to be low-FODMAP.
Cookbook Signing Info:
When – Sunday, June 5, 2016 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM (PDT)
Where – 2Good2B Bakery – 204 North El Camino Real, Encinitas, CA 92024
The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook is available now from these booksellers: Amazon: http://goo.gl/wDxqnO, Barnes & Noble: goo.gl/Z8W2e5, Indiebound: goo.gl/VtWxW9 and Target: http://goo.gl/b5kHfA. Publisher: F+W Media. Publish Date: May 6, 2016
# # #
About the Author
Colleen Francioli, CNC educates and coaches those with IBS, other functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and food intolerances. She once suffered from IBS herself and has since found life balance with the low-FODMAP diet, an elimination diet developed in Australia, proven to help relieve symptoms of IBS.  Colleen started her blogwww.FODMAPLife.com to help others with IBS learn how to choose the right foods and stress relief instead of pharma drugs. Colleen is a trained photographer and sommelier. Her background includes working as a digital marketing strategist, mostly for clients in the health and wellness sectors.

New Recipe: Low-FODMAP Blueberry Lavender Pancakes

I love lavender.  I love the color and the sweet floral fragrance…I love the sight of lavender fields, the smell of lavender essential oils and I also love lavender in foods.

Lavender gives baked goods and pancakes a lovely taste, and also goes well with lemon flavors.  I was looking for a reason to experiment with pancakes recently, and am very pleased with the recipe below, and I think you will just love these pancakes and the hint of lavender along with the delicate blueberries.

You can learn about the history of lavender here.  I also love the recipe here for Lemon and Lavender Chicken -just be sure to swap out the high-FODMAP honey for low-FODMAP maple syrup.

I adapted the recipe below from Bob’s Red Mill Fluffy Gluten Free Pancakes recipe.  When I worked with Bob’s Red Mill recipe, at first it seemed a little too dry so I added more milk and also swapped olive oil for coconut oil.  The other additions I made to their basic recipe was to add in fresh blueberries and No. 3 Lavender Infused Simple Syrup from Sonoma and Co.

I had fun styling this photograph and dripping the delicious maple syrup on top…can you just taste the pancakes now?  My Mother’s gorgeous Belleek China Shamrock Teapot can be seen in the background, along with flowers from my garden and a white vase from the table settings we used for my wedding.
low fodmap blueberry lavender pancakes

Low-FODMAP Blueberry Lavender Pancakes

*TIP – When buying flours make sure you read labels to ensure no high-FODMAPs are in the ingredient list.  I like using Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free 1 to 1 Baking Flour for many of my recipes.

Directions

  1. Preheat a griddle or frying pan to medium or medium-high heat (350 – 375°F).
  2. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.
  3. Place coconut oil in a microwave-safe bowl and melt on high for 30-45 seconds (microwave times vary).
  4. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, melted coconut oil and simple syrup.
  5. Using a wire whisk, combine wet ingredients into dry ingredients and whisk until smooth.  Gently fold in blueberries.
  6. Ladle approximately ⅓ cup pancake batter onto hot griddle or pan. Once bubbly and edges begin to thicken and are dry, flip to opposite side.  Cook on each side for about 3 – 4 minutes per side.
  7. Garnish with a pinch of confectioner’s sugar and edible lavender if desired!

Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Looking for help on the low-FODMAP diet?  Ask me about my nutritional coaching services by contacting me here.

Be good to yourself and your gut!BEC_6825

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme

New Recipe – Amy and Brian Coconut Water Infused with Low-FODMAP Fruit

I love working with different foods and drinks, especially when I can get creative and make new recipes.

low fodmap amy and brian copy

Take a look at these beautiful coconut waters (above) in mason jars, infused with low-FODMAP fruits (and a little gin in one!).

Recently I had the pleasure of getting creative in the kitchen with two of my favorite foods – fruit and coconut water, namely coconut water by the brand Amy & Brian Coconut Water (if you missed my first recipe, you can check it out here- Review and Recipe : Amy and Brian’s Coconut Water and Low-FODMAP Coconut Cream Papaya Popsicles).

I made recipes for three fruit-infused coconut waters, one spiked with gin (low-FODMAP).    The virgin recipes were so fun and easy to make, colorful and great for when you want to drink something other than water.  The gin recipe (at far right) is great for a hot day or also makes a beautiful presentation for your next party.

low fodmap amy and brian

Coconut water is low in FODMAPs (packaged or fresh) at 100ml.  That gives you room to drink coconut water as is or experiment and use it in smoothies, desserts, in stir fry, soups, dressings and more.  Gin is low in FODMAPs and a suggested serving is 30 ml (29 grams).  *See my note about alcohol below.

Low-FODMAP Fruit-Infused Coconut Water (with gin)

  • 1 small mason jar
  • 4 thin slices of kiwi
  • ½ large strawberry, quartered
  • 1 ounce gin
  • 3 ounces Amy & Brian Coconut Water with Lime
  • 2 ounces filtered water
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice

Directions  

  1. Layer in all slices of kiwi to mason jar.  Add in strawberry.
  2. Pour in gin, coconut water and lime juice.
  3. Close jar with lid and refrigerate for at least 3-4 hours before enjoying.

 

And for the virgins…I used the same recipe above, minus the gin and used these low-FODMAP servings of fruit

Kiwi -Pineapple: 1/2 cup chopped fresh pineapple with two slices of kiwi and a pinch of cinnamon

Strawberry- Blueberry: 2 medium strawberries, chopped and 10 blueberries

ENJOY!

*Please remember alcohol is a gut irritant and the suggested serving is one serving for women and up to two for men.  Consider limiting alcohol when on the low-FODMAP diet so you can keep your gut calm and more accurately pinpoint your potential IBS triggers.

 

My new book The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook is available for pre-order now!  Get your copy from Amazon: http://goo.gl/wDxqnO, Barnes & Noble: goo.gl/Z8W2e5, Indiebound: goo.gl/VtWxW9 and Target: http://goo.gl/b5kHfA. Publisher: F+W Media. Publish Date: May 6, 2016

The Everything Low FODMAP Diet Cookbook

Don’t forget to follow me on social media and sign up for my newsletter! Follow/like/comment on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest.

Looking for help on the low-FODMAP diet?  Ask me about my nutritional coaching services by contacting me here.

Be good to yourself and your gut!BEC_6825

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme

Recipe Preview from The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook!

Low-FODMAP Raspberry Lemon Chia Seed Jam
Low-FODMAP Raspberry Lemon Chia Seed.  Photo by Kelly Jaggers from The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook by Colleen Francioli, CNC, copyright © 2016 by F+W Media, Inc.

May is Going to Be Awesome

I am looking forward to May for a couple reasons.  For one, we will be celebrating my son’s first birthday (I am planning a Ferrari theme and think I’ll have more fun that most of the kids).  It will also be my first Mother’s Day as a Mom and May is also my birthday month as well.  And lastly it is the month of my book launch.  I wrote over 300 low-FODMAP and gluten-free recipes, plus menu plans, tips and advice (like reading labels, how to eat out, hidden FODMAPs and wellness tips to name a few) and more.  It was a very rewarding process, and I also learned new tricks – like how to type out ingredients with one finger while breastfeeding my baby!  Yes, that happened, many times.  I wrote the book in under two months, while my husband and I cared for my son at just five months of age.

I Wrote the Recipes for You

My fans have taught me a lot over the years with FODMAP Life, commenting on my blog and social media channels.  One topic that always comes up is recipes.  You want them to be delicious, flavorful, you want some of the classics and most of the time, you want them to be easy or quick to make (and I am busy too, so I understand!).  You will find plenty of recipes like those in the book, but I also included some recipes that require a bit more TLC and finesse.  My fans are from all over the world, so in the book you will also see dishes that are culturally inspired.  I also took very traditional recipes and made them low-FODMAP – the types of recipes only your oenophile or epicurean friends would respect!

More Than Just a Cookbook

The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook also includes a chapter dedicated to the basics of the diet, as well as advice and tips like how to read labels to find low- or high-FODMAPs, how to eat out on the diet, how to plan meals, and how to work in stress relief for a calm body and mind. Menu plans, low- and high-FODMAP food lists and diet resources can also be found in the appendices.

Mmmm What’s Delicious in the Book?

Some of the recipes featured are: Cranberry Almond Granola, Strawberry Coconut Almond Smoothie, Quinoa, Corn, and Zucchini Fritters, Coconut Curry Lemongrass Soup, Roasted Parsnips with Rosemary, Blueberry-Glazed Chicken, Citrus Flank Steak, Grilled Swordfish with Pineapple Salsa, Mexican Risotto and Spiced Pumpkin Cupcakes. Included in the book are breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack recipes, condiments, sauces and dressings, cookies, bars, desserts, drinks as well as a chapter “from scratch” featuring recipes for low-FODMAP bread, pizza dough and more. Chapters for vegetarian, vegan as well as main dishes and snacks for children also included.

How to Purchase

The Everything® Low-FODMAP Diet Cookbook is available from these booksellers:

Publisher: F+W Media. Publish Date: May 6, 2016

Thanks for supporting FODMAP Life with your purchase of the book!

Good to Know

Many condiments sold today are made with high-FODMAP ingredients, however, my book includes recipes for several different condiments, sauces and dressings that you can make very easily at home and use right away or store for later use.  Enjoy the recipe below:

 

Raspberry Lemon Chia Seed Jam (Low-FODMAP, GF, Vegan)

This jam is delicious on a warm gluten-free scone, on gluten-free toast with butter, or mixed into a tub of lactose-free yogurt.

Ingredients

Makes 1 cup

  • 1/2 pint (or 6 ounces) fresh raspberries
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds

Directions

  1. Add fruit, lemon juice, lemon zest, and maple syrup to a small saucepan and cook over medium-high heat. Cover. Stir occasionally until fruit begins to thicken, about 10 minutes.
  2. Uncover and bring mixture to a boil until it develops a sauce-like consistency, about 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in chia seeds and cook 2 more minutes. Stir again and then remove from heat.
  4. Transfer jam to an airtight jar or other container and allow to cool, or refrigerate 2–3 hours before use. The jam will continue to thicken. Can be stored in refrigerator 2 weeks or frozen up to 2 months.

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Be good to yourself and your gut!BEC_6825

Colleen Francioli

Certified Nutritionist Consultant
Founder FODMAP Life & BonCalme